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Keyword: adaptive management

2017 megafires in British Columbia: Urgent need to adapt and improve resilience to wildfire

Publications Posted on: April 11, 2021
The status quo approach of addressing wildfire threat in British Columbia is not working. In 2017, wildfires overwhelmed suppression capabilities, burned 1.2 million hectares, and cost $568 million for suppression and immediate rehabilitation. From 2003 to 2017, the Provincial government spent $3.1 billion on direct fire suppression, but only $73.8 million on proactive fuels mitigation in the wildland-urban interface.

Balancing timber production and deer forage in young-growth silviculture in southeast Alaska

Projects Posted on: April 15, 2020
Forest management in southeast Alaska has been shifting away from old-growth management and toward young-growth to better provide the goods and services expected from this vast temperate rainforest. Managers and researchers have been working together to develop silvicultural tending strategies that provide benefits to timber, wildlife, and biodiversity.

Initiating climate adaptation in a western larch forest

Publications Posted on: September 10, 2019
Western larch forests are iconic in the interior northwest, and here we document the preemptive steps that scientists and managers are taking to steward these forests into the future. Changing climate is forecast to have acute and chronic impacts on growth and disturbance in western larch forests.

Integration and tradeoffs [Chapter 9]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
Managing for sagebrush ecosystems that are resilient to disturbance and resistant to invasive plants often requires managers to make tough decisions in the face of considerable complexity and uncertainty. The decisionmaking environment is often characterized by multiple management objectives, limited management authority and capabilities, dynamic ecosystems and plant communities, and uncertain responses to management actions.

Wild horse and burro considerations [Chapter 8]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
Wild horses (Equus caballus) and wild burros (E. asinus), like domestic livestock, can alter sagebrush ecosystem structure and composition and affect habitat quality for sagebrush dependent species (Beever and Aldridge 2011). The presence of Federally protected wild horses and wild burros can also have substantial effects on the capacity for habitat restoration efforts to achieve conservation and restoration goals.

Livestock grazing management [Chapter 7]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
Part 1 of the Science Framework identifies livestock grazing as the most widespread land use in the sagebrush biome (Chambers et al. 2017a; hereafter, Part 1). In the Conservation Objectives Team Report (USDOI FWS 2013) improper livestock grazing is considered a present and widespread threat to Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, GRSG) for most GRSG populations.

Application of national seed strategy concepts [Chapter 6]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
Native plant species are the foundation of sagebrush ecosystems and provide essential habitat for wildlife species, such as Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, GRSG).

Invasive plant management [Chapter 5]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
One of the most significant stressors to the sagebrush biome is expansion and dominance of nonnative ecosystem-transforming species, particularly invasive annual and perennial plants.

Wildland fire and vegetation management [Chapter 4]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
Wildland fire has always been an important ecosystem process across the sagebrush biome. Recently, the scale of sagebrush ecosystem loss and fragmentation has increased due to a combination of uncharacteristic wildland fire, invasive annual grasses, juniper (Juniperus spp.) and piñon (Pinus spp.) expansion, and anthropogenic land use and development.

Climate adaptation [Chapter 3]

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
Management actions that enable adaptation to climate change and promote resilience to disturbance are becoming increasingly important in the sagebrush biome. In recent decades temperatures have increased, growing seasons have lengthened, and in many areas the timing and amount of precipitation has changed (Chambers et al. 2017 [hereafter, Part 1], section 4; Kunkel et al. 2013a,b,c).

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