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Keyword: coarse woody debris

Small mammals of the Bitterroot National Forest: Ecological significance and guidelines for management

Publications Posted on: June 22, 2020
Small mammal literature was reviewed to assess the ecological role of small mammals on the Bitterroot National Forest of western Montana. Small mammals fulfill numerous important roles in forest ecosystems by supporting a wide range of predators, dispersing seeds and mycorrhizal spores, altering vegetation through herbivory and seed predation, and preying on insects.

Soil properties in fire-consumed log burnout openings in a Missouri oak savanna

Publications Posted on: June 22, 2020
Downed logs are known to increase species diversity in many forest ecosystems by increasing resource and structural complexity and by altering fire behavior in fire-prone ecosystems. In a frequently burned oak savanna in central Missouri, combustion of downed logs formed patches that have remained free of herbaceous vegetation for more than 3 years.

Coarse woody debris in mature Pinus ponderosa stands in Colorado

Publications Posted on: December 23, 2019
During summer of 1994, 328 0.1 ha circular plots were sampled to determine the volume of coarse woody debris (CWD) and standing dead density and basal area in 53 mature or older Pinus ponderosa stands in the Front Range and Southwestern mountains of Colorado. Standing dead volume was estimated using height derived from living trees in the plots.

Fuel dynamics after reintroduced fire in an old-growth Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forest

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
cSurface fuel loadings are some of the most important factors contributing to fire intensity and fire spread. In old-growth forests where fire has been long excluded, surface fuel loadings can be high and can include woody debris ≥100 cm in diameter.

Correction to: A case study comparison of LANDFIRE fuel loading and emissions generation on a mixed conifer forest in Northern Idaho, USA

Publications Posted on: September 14, 2019
Following publication of the original article (Hyde et al., 2015), the authors have noticed two errors in the summarizing of our results and wish to point out the following corrections.

Environmental, structural, and disturbance influences over forest floor components in interior Douglas-fir forests of the Intermountain West, USA

Publications Posted on: August 21, 2018
Downed woody material (DWM) is a key component in forest ecosystems with age, structure, and disturbance described as primary factors that influence DWM dynamics. In particular, much emphasis is placed on large coarse woody debris (CWD).

Density-dependent woody detritus accumulation in an even-aged, single-species forest

Publications Posted on: August 17, 2018
Deadwood in forests influences fire intensity, stores carbon and nutrients, and provides wildlife habitat. We used a 54-year-old density management experiment in Larix occidentalis Nutt. forests to evaluate density dependence of woody detritus accumulation. Based on self-thinning theory, we expected woody detritus produced by the current stand to increase with stand density.

Historic range of variability for upland vegetation in the Medicine Bow National Forest, Wyoming

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
An approach for synthesizing the results of ecological research pertinent to land management is the analysis of the historic range of variability (HRV) for key ecosystem variables that are affected by management activities. This report provides an HRV analysis for the upland vegetation of the Medicine Bow National Forest in southeastern Wyoming.

Historic range of variability for upland vegetation in the Bighorn National Forest, Wyoming

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
An approach for synthesizing the results of ecological research pertinent to land management is the analysis of the historic range of variability (HRV) for key ecosystem variables that are affected by management activities. This report provides an HRV analysis for the upland vegetation of the Bighorn National Forest in northcentral Wyoming.

Fuel: Logs, sticks, needles, duff, and much more

Publications Posted on: March 27, 2018
Fuels burned by either prescribed or wildfires are complex and important components of forested ecosystems. Fine fuels consisting of fallen limbs, twigs, and leaves of shrubs and trees are rich in nutrients. If these fuels are not immediately burned, nutrients can leach from these materials into the forest floor, especially if they overwinter.

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