You are here

Keyword: coarse woody debris

Biomass and carbon attributes of downed woody materials in forests of the United States

Publications Posted on: June 24, 2013
Due to burgeoning interest in the biomass/carbon attributes of forest downed and dead woody materials (DWMs) attributable to its fundamental role in the carbon cycle, stand structure/diversity, bioenergy resources, and fuel loadings, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has conducted a nationwide field-based inventory of DWM.

Small mammals of the Bitterroot National Forest: A literature review and annotated bibliography

Publications Posted on: December 31, 2012
Small mammal literature from western Montana and the Northern Rocky Mountains was reviewed to assess the ecological role of small mammals on the Bitterroot National Forest of western Montana and in the Northern Rocky Mountains.

Ten years after wildfires: How does varying tree mortality impact fire hazard and forest resiliency?

Publications Posted on: July 20, 2012
Severe wildfires across the western US have lead to concerns about heavy surface fuel loading and the potential for high-intensity reburning. Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests, often overly dense from a century of fire suppression, are increasingly susceptible to large and severe wildfires especially given warmer and drier climate projections for the future.

Coarse woody debris assay in northern Arizona mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests

Publications Posted on: June 11, 2010
Coarse woody debris (CWD) provides important ecosystem services in forests and affects fire behavior, yet information on amounts and types of CWD typically is limited. To provide such information, we sampled logs and stumps in mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests in north-central Arizona. Spatial variability was prominent for all CWD parameters.

Stand characteristics and downed woody debris accumulations associated with a mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) outbreak in Colorado

Publications Posted on: December 02, 2009
Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.)-dominated ecosystems in north-central Colorado are undergoing rapid and drastic changes associated with overstory tree mortality from a currentmountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) outbreak.

Can live tree size-density relationships provide a mechanism for predicting down and dead tree resources?

Publications Posted on: July 20, 2009
Live tree size-density relationships in forests have long provided a framework for understanding stand dynamics. There has been little examination of the relationship between the size-density attributes of live and standing/down dead trees (e.g., number and mean tree size per unit area, such information could help in large-scale efforts to estimate dead wood resources.

User's guide [Chapter 3]

Publications Posted on: June 17, 2009
The Fire and Fuels Extension (FFE) to the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) simulates fuel dynamics and potential fire behavior over time, in the context of stand development and management. This chapter presents the model's options, provides annotated examples, describes the outputs, and describes how to use and apply the model.

Purpose and applications [Chapter 1]

Publications Posted on: June 17, 2009
The Fire and Fuels Extension (FFE) to the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) simulates fuel dynamics and potential fire behavior over time, in the context of stand development and management. This chapter provides an introduction to the model by illustrating its purpose and chronicling some of the applications it has supported.

Fire frequency effects on fuel loadings in pine-oak forests of the Madrean Province

Publications Posted on: October 25, 2007
Loadings of downed woody fuels in pine-oak forests of the Madrean Province are heavier on sites in southeastern Arizona with low fire frequencies and lower on sites in northeastern Sonora, Mexico, with high fire frequencies. Low fire frequencies in southeastern Arizona are attributed largely to past land uses and the fire suppression policies of land management agencies in the United States.

Changes in snag populations in northern Arizona mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests, 1997-2002

Publications Posted on: July 26, 2006
Snags (standing dead trees) are important components of forests that contribute to ecological processes and provide habitat for many life forms. We monitored dynamics of snag populations on 1-ha plots in southwestern mixed-conifer (n = 53 plots) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa, n = 60 plots) forests in north-central Arizona from 1997 to 2002.

Pages