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Keyword: Colorado front range

Effects of ozone and climate on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) growth in the Colorado Rocky Mountains

Publications Posted on: December 23, 2019
Long-term radial growth trends of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa var. scopuforum) were studied in second-growth stands in the Front Range of the Colorado Rocky Mountains to determine if there has been any impact from oxidant air pollution. Although ozone concentrations are relatively high at some locations, visible pollutant injury was not found in any trees. Time series of basal area increments are generally homogeneous within stands.

Example specifications for fuels treatment contract

Publications Posted on: December 18, 2019
The recent impetus to reduce wildfire risk in urban interface forests of the Colorado Front Range has resulted in the adoption of mechanized thinning to reduce forest density. Lack of suitable markets for the resulting biomass has further prompted the use of in-the-woods chipping and mastication (chunking) to reduce the flammability of the material and scatter it on-site.

Litter and dead wood dynamics in ponderosa pine 
forests along a 160-year chronosequence

Publications Posted on: December 18, 2019
Disturbances such as fire play a key role in controlling ecosystem structure. In fire-prone forests, organic detritus comprises a large pool of carbon and can control the frequency and intensity of fire. The ponderosa pine forests of the Colorado Front Range, USA, where fire has been suppressed for a century, provide an ideal system for studying the long-term dynamics of detrital pools.

Collaborative restoration effects on forest structure in ponderosa pine-dominated forests of Colorado

Publications Posted on: May 10, 2018
In response to large, severe wildfires in historically fire-adapted forests in the western US, policy initiatives, such as the USDA Forest Service’s Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP), seek to increase the pace and scale of ecological restoration. One required component of this program is collaborative adaptive management, in which monitoring data are used to iteratively evaluate and improve future management actions.

Building resilience in Colorado Front Range forests for the future

Pages Posted on: February 22, 2018
The recently published "Principles and Practices for the Restoration of Ponderosa Pine and Dry Mixed-Conifer Forests of the Colorado Front Range" (RMRS-GTR-373) provides a synthesis of information specific to Colorado’s Front Range, while outlining a framework to guide forest management and treatment design criteria that can be used by land managers far and wide. This Science You Can Use (in 5 minutes) highlights the main themes of this approach to place-based restoration.

Building Resilience in Colorado Front Range Forests

Documents and Media Posted on: February 01, 2018
The recently published "Principles and Practices for the Restoration of Ponderosa Pine and Dry Mixed-Conifer Forests of the Colorado Front Range" (RMRS-GTR-373) provides a synthesis of information specific to Colorado’s Front Range, while outlining a framework to guide forest management and treatment design criteria that can be used by land managers far and wide. This Science You Can Use (in 5 minutes) highlights the main themes of this approach to place-based restoration. Document Type: Other Documents

Back to the Future: Building resilience in Front Range forests

Documents and Media Posted on: February 01, 2018
This Science You Can Use Bulletin highlights a new science-based framework for Colorado Front Range forest restoration. Document Type: Other Documents

Back to the Future: Building resilience in Colorado Front Range forests using research findings and a new guide for restoration of ponderosa and dry-mixed conifer landscapes

Publications Posted on: February 01, 2018
Historically, the ponderosa and dry mixed-conifer forests of the Colorado Front Range were more open and grassy, and trees of all size classes were found in a grouped arrangement with sizable openings between the clumps. As a legacy of fire suppression, today’s forests are denser, with smaller trees. Proactive restoration of this forest type will help to reduce fuel loads and the risk of large and severe wildfires in the Colorado Front Range.

Did the 2002 Hayman Fire, Colorado, USA, burn with uncharacteristic severity?

Publications Posted on: January 05, 2017
There is considerable interest in evaluating whether recent wildfires in dry conifer forests of western North America are burning with uncharacteristic severity - that is, with a severity outside the historical range of variability. In 2002, the Hayman Fire burned an unlogged 3400 ha dry conifer forest landscape in the Colorado Front Range, USA, that had been the subject of previous fire history and forest age structure research.

Was the 2002 Hayman Fire, Colorado, an uncharacteristically severe event?

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 18, 2016
In 2002, the Hayman Fire burned across the unlogged Cheesman Lake landscape, a 3,400 hectare dry-conifer forest landscape in Colorado that had been the subject of previous fire history and forest structure research. We opportunistically leveraged pre-existing fire history and forest structure to provide insight into whether the Hayman Fire burned more severely than historical ones.

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