You are here

Keyword: community ecology

Aerial biomass and elemental changes in Atriplex canescens and A. acanthocarpa as affected by salinity and soil water availability

Publications Posted on: September 18, 2013
Atriplex canescens and A. acanthocarpa from the Chihuahuan Desert in Mexico were subjected to different salinity and irrigation treatments in a greenhouse study. Plants were grown in pots containing soil and irrigated with NaCl solutions of 0, 50, and 100 mM at 40 and 80 percent available soil water. Aerial biomass of A. canescens declined as NaCl treatments increased. In contrast, the aerial biomass of A.

Long-shoot/short-shoot phenomenon in woody plants

Publications Posted on: September 18, 2013
Shoot growth in shrubs is often overlooked as an important component of phenological development in woody plants. However, shoot growth dictates the pattern of growth of deciduous trees or shrubs, especially following defoliation or canopy damage. In general, woody shoots are divided into short- and long-shoots. Short-shoots, sometimes called "spurs," are reproductive shoots (in other words, spurs on an apple (Malus pumila) tree).

Total available carbohydrates in serviceberry after late dummer and fall burning

Publications Posted on: September 18, 2013
Total available carbohydrate (TAC) storage and depletion was measured in late summer and fall burned and unburned serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia). The purpose of the study was to assess the influence of late season prescribed fire on the vigor of serviceberry, a key browse species on white-tailed deer (Odecoileus virginianus ochrourus) winter range in northeastern Washington.

Nitrogen-fixing nodule characterization and morphology of four species in the northern Intermountain Region

Publications Posted on: September 18, 2013
Purshia tridentata (antelope bitterbrush), Ceanothus velutinus (snowbrush), Ceanothus sanguenius (redstem ceanothus), and Shepherdia canadensis (buffaloberry) are native shrubs of the Northern Intermountain Region that are generally characterized as nitrogen-fixing species. These species occupy a range of habitats from steppe to alpine environments.

Carbon transport by symbiotic fungi in fourwing saltbush, Atriplex canescens (Pursh) Nutt

Publications Posted on: September 18, 2013
Mycorrhizal fungi enhance the nutrition and survival of host plants in native ecosystems. Arid rangelands severely challenge plants because of chronic nutrient and water stress. Fourwing saltbush, Atriplex canescens (Pursh) Nutt., a dominant and important shrub of western arid rangelands, generally considered to be non-mycorrhizal, is more extensively colonized by dark septate (DS) fungal endophytes than by traditional mycorrhizal fungi.

Composition of vegetable oil from seeds of native halophytes

Publications Posted on: September 18, 2013
Of the world’s land area, about 7 percent is salt affected. Irrigated land is more susceptible to salinity and it is estimated that over 1/3 of the irrigated soils are becoming saline. Certain plants (halophytes) grow well on high saline soils. One approach would be to grow halophytes on high saline soils and harvest their seeds. The oil in the seeds would be extracted for cooking oil.

Microcalorimetric studies on metabolic and germination response to temperature for three populations of winterfat (Eurotia lanata)

Publications Posted on: September 18, 2013
Eurotia lanata (Pursh) Moq. (winterfat) is a boreal cold-desert subshrub, seldom more than 2 feet tall, that thrives in dry climates at cool temperatures. Diaspore collections from Matador, Saskatchewan, Canada; Pine Bluffs, Wyoming; and Sterling, Colorado, were cleaned and placed on moistened filter paper in petri dishes maintained at 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C to study germination.

Calorimetric studies of cryptogamic crust metabolism in response to temperature, water vapor, and liquid water

Publications Posted on: September 18, 2013
Cryptogamic crusts are communities composed of lichens, cyanobacteria, algae, mosses, and fungi. These integrated soil crusts are susceptible to disturbance, but if intact, appear to play a role in providing nutrients, especially nitrogen, to higher plants. It is not known how or under what conditions desert crusts can grow.

Temperature-dependent respiration-growth relations in ancestral maize cultivars

Publications Posted on: September 18, 2013
Shoots from 4- to 6-day old seedlings of seven ancestral or old cultivars of Zea mays L. were placed in a calorimeter. Dark metabolic heat rate (q) and CO2 production rate (RCO2) were measured at nine temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 °C). Temperature dependencies of q and RCO2 were used to model response of both growth and substrate carbon conversion efficiency.

Respiratory and physiological characteristics in subpopulations of Great Basin cheatgrass

Publications Posted on: September 18, 2013
Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) is a dominant weed that has increased the frequency of wildfire in the Great Basin since its introduction approximately 106 years ago. Characteristics of respiratory metabolism were examined in eleven subpopulations from different habitats.

Pages