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Keyword: decision support

A geospatial framework to assess fireline effectiveness for large wildfires in the western USA

Publications Posted on: August 18, 2020
Quantifying fireline effectiveness (FLE) is essential to evaluate the efficiency of large wildfire management strategies to foster institutional learning and improvement in fire management organizations.

Exploring information needs for wildland fire and fuels management

Publications Posted on: June 22, 2020
We report the results of a questionnaire and workshop that sought to gain a better and deeper understanding of the contemporary information needs of wildland fire and fuels managers.

Wildfire risk science facilitates adaptation of fire-prone social-ecological systems to the new fire reality

Publications Posted on: June 17, 2020
Large and severe wildfires are an observable consequence of an increasingly arid American West. There is increasing consensus that human communities, land managers, and fire managers need to adapt and learn to live with wildfires. However, a myriad of human and ecological factors constrain adaptation, and existing science-based management strategies are not sufficient to address fire as both a problem and solution.

FIRE-BIRD wildlife habitat tool Webinar Transcript and Slides - May 21, 2020

Documents and Media Posted on: May 28, 2020
Transcript and slides for the May 21, 2020 webinar featuring RMRS researchers Vicki Saab and Todd Cross. Document Type: Other Documents

FIRE-BIRD wildlife habitat tool

Events Posted on: April 29, 2020
On May 21, 2020 RMRS researchers Vicki Saab and Todd Cross discussed FIRE-BIRD, an ArcGIS spatial tool for applying habitat suitability models for woodpecker species of concern to generate maps that inform forest management planning. 

FIRE-BIRD: A GIS tool for applying habitat suitability models to inform land management planning

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 04, 2019
To conserve and promote biological diversity, land managers must identify suitable habitat for species of conservation concern. Managers can then restrict potentially detrimental activities (e.g., salvage logging) to areas of lower habitat suitability, and target beneficial activities (e.g., restoration) where habitat suitability is higher. We developed FIRE-BIRD, an ArcGIS tool, to map habitat suitability for disturbance-associated woodpeckers of conservation concern to inform postfire management and restoration treatments in dry mixed-conifer forests. 

FIRE-BIRD: Habitat suitability model application tools for disturbance-associated woodpeckers

Tools Posted on: July 25, 2019
FIRE-BIRD is an ArcGIS spatial tool for applying habitat suitability models to generate maps that inform forest management planning. This tool focuses on disturbance-associated woodpecker species of conservation concern.

FIRE-BIRD: A GIS-based toolset for applying habitat suitability models to inform land management planning

Publications Posted on: June 20, 2019
Habitat suitability models can inform forest management for species of conservation concern. Models quantify relationships between known species locations and environmental attributes, which are used to identify areas most likely to support species of concern. Managers can then limit negative human impacts in areas of high suitability or conduct habitat improvements in areas of marginal suitability.

Use of lidar-derived landscape parameters to characterize alternative harvest system options in the Inland Northwest

Publications Posted on: November 21, 2018
As innovative harvest systems are developed, the extent to which they can be utilized on the landscape based on machine capabilities is often unclear to forest managers. Spatial decision support models may aid contractors and forest planners in choosing appropriate logging systems based on topography and stand characteristics.

Spatial optimization of operationally relevant large fire confine and point protection strategies: Model development and test cases

Publications Posted on: April 03, 2018
This study introduces a large fire containment strategy that builds upon recent advances in spatial fire planning, notably the concept of potential wildland fire operation delineations (PODs). Multiple PODs can be clustered together to form a “box” that is referred as the “response POD” (or rPOD). Fire lines would be built along the boundary of an rPOD to contain a large fire.

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