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Keyword: dendrochronology

Nondestructive age estimation of mountain big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. vaseyana) using morphological characteristics

Publications Posted on: September 14, 2019
Current methods for determining plant age of shrub species require destructive sampling and annual growth ring analysis on the primary stem. Although individual plant ages can frequently be determined in this manner, the method is time consuming and of limited value for plants that have lost stem wood from stem splitting and rot.

Identifying old trees to inform ecological restoration in montane forests of the central Rocky Mountains, USA

Publications Posted on: April 05, 2019
Old trees (defined here as ≥150 years old) can be rare in many forests because of past timber harvest, uncharacteristically severe wildfires, and - increasingly - climate change. Old trees provide unique structural, ecological, scientific, and aesthetic values missing in forests containing only younger trees.

A multi-century history of fire regimes along a transect of mixed-conifer forests in central Oregon, U.S.A

Publications Posted on: December 14, 2018
Dry mixed-conifer forests are widespread in the interior Pacific Northwest, but their historical fire regimes are poorly characterized, in particular the relative mix of low- and high-severity fire. We reconstructed a multi-century history of fire from tree rings in dry mixed-conifer forests in central Oregon. These forests are dominated by ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson & C.

Climatic drivers of ponderosa pine growth in central Idaho

Publications Posted on: December 04, 2018
Despite the widespread use of ponderosa pine as an important hydroclimate proxy, we actually understand very little about its climate response in the Northern Rockies. Here, we analyze two new ponderosa pine chronologies to investigate how climate influences annual growth.

When tree rings go global: Challenges and opportunities for retro- and prospective insight

Publications Posted on: December 04, 2018
The demand for large-scale and long-term information on tree growth is increasing rapidly as environmental change research strives to quantify and forecast the impacts of continued warming on forest ecosystems. This demand, combined with the now quasi-global availability of tree-ring observations, has inspired researchers to compile large tree-ring networks to address continental or even global-scale research questions.

Looking Into the Past: How Reconstructing Historical Forest Conditions Can Help Future Restoration Efforts

Documents and Media Posted on: November 14, 2018
This Science You Can Use in 5 Minutes looks at ponderosa-dominating forests and how looking at historical structures helps restore these forests. Document Type: Other Documents

Condition of live fire-scarred ponderosa pine twenty-one years after removing partial cross-sections

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2018
Concern over the effects of removing fire-scarred partial cross-sections may limit sampling of live ponderosa pine to reconstruct fire history. We report mortality rates for ponderosa pine trees 20 to 21 years after removing fire-scarred partial cross-sections to reconstruct fire history.

Changes in forest structure since 1860 in ponderosa pine dominated forests in the Colorado and Wyoming Front Range, USA

Publications Posted on: April 23, 2018
Management practices since the late 19th century, including fire exclusion and harvesting, have altered the structure of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex P. Lawson & C. Lawson) dominated forests across the western United States. These structural changes have the potential to contribute to uncharacteristic wildfire behavior and effects.

Fire and fuel treatments increase tree resistance to bark beetles

Science Spotlights Posted on: April 10, 2018
The frequency of fire in low-elevation coniferous forests in western North America has greatly declined since the late 1800s. In many areas, this has increased tree density, increased the proportion of shade-tolerant species, reduced resource availability, and increased forest susceptibility to forest insect pests and high-severity wildfire. This study investigated how low-intensity fire affects tree defenses and whether fuel treatments impact resistance to a mountain pine beetle outbreak.

Paleo-event data standards for dendrochronology

Publications Posted on: April 03, 2018
Extreme environmental events, such as storm winds, landslides, insect infestations, and wildfire, cause loss of life, resources, and human infrastructure. Disaster riskreduction analysis can be improved with information about past frequency, intensity, and spatial patterns of extreme events.

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