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Keyword: Dendroctonus ponderosae

Applied chemical ecology of the mountain pine beetle

Publications Posted on: June 27, 2014
Mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a primary agent of forest disturbance in western North America. Episodic outbreaks occur at the convergence of favorable forest age and size class structure and climate patterns. Recent outbreaks have exceeded the historic range of variability of D. ponderosae-caused tree mortality affecting ecosystem goods and services at broad spatial scales.

Mountain pine beetle, a major disturbance agent in US western coniferous forests: A synthesis of the state of knowledge

Publications Posted on: June 27, 2014
It is well documented in the scientific and popular literature that large-scale bark beetle outbreaks are occurring across many coniferous forests in the western United States. One of the major species exhibiting extensive eruptive populations resulting in high levels of tree mortality is the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Hopkins) (Negron et al. 2008) (Figure 1). The literature on D.

Mountain pine beetle voltinism and life history characteristics across latitudinal and elevational gradients in the western United States

Publications Posted on: June 27, 2014
Substantial genetic variation in development time is known to exist among mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) populations across the western United States. The effect of this variation on geographic patterns in voltinism (generation time) and thermal requirements to produce specific voltinism pathways have not been investigated. The influence of voltinism on fitness traits, body size, and sex ratio is also unclear.

Cultural practices for prevention and control of mountain pine beetle infestations

Publications Posted on: September 27, 2013
In recent years, the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, has impacted >8.9 million hectares of forests in the western United States. During endemic populations, trees weakened by other agents are often colonized by D. ponderosae but may be difficult to detect due to their scarcity.

Identifying "redtops": Classification of satellite imagery for tracking mountain pine beetle progression through a pine forest

Publications Posted on: May 21, 2013
Mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) are a pest indigenous to the pine forests of the western United States. Capable of exponential population growth, mountain pine beetles can destroy thousands of acres of trees in a short period of time.

A test of high-dose verbenone for stand-level protection of lodgepole and whitebark pine from mountain pine beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) attacks

Publications Posted on: May 21, 2013
The effcacy of verbenone as a stand-level protectant against mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, attacks was tested in lodgepole and whitebark pine stands at five geographically separated sites, including three consecutive years at one site. Forty and 20 high-dose pouches, with a verbenone emission rate up to 50 mg/d per pouch, were spaced in a grid pattern throughout 0.40-ha plots, replicated up to six times at each site.

Modeling cold tolerance in the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae

Publications Posted on: May 21, 2013
Cold-induced mortality is a key factor driving mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, population dynamics. In this species, the supercooling point (SCP) is representative of mortality induced by acute cold exposure. Mountain pine beetle SCP and associated cold-induced mortality fluctuate throughout a generation, with the highest SCPs prior to and following winter. Using observed SCPs of field-collected D.

Mountain pine beetle

Publications Posted on: May 20, 2013
The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) is a member of a group of insects known as bark beetles. Its entire life cycle is spent beneath the bark of host trees, except when adults emerge from brood trees and fly in search of new host trees.

Fire-injured ponderosa pine provide a pulsed resource for bark beetles

Publications Posted on: May 20, 2013
Bark beetles can cause substantial mortality of trees that would otherwise survive fire injuries. Resin response of fire-injured northern Rocky Mountain ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex P. Lawson & C. Lawson) and specific injuries that contribute to increased bark beetle attack susceptibility and brood production are unknown.

Microclimate: an alternative to tree vigor as a basis for mountain pine beetle infestations

Publications Posted on: May 02, 2013
Thinning lodgepole pine stands increased light intensity, wind movement, insolation, and temperature. Temperatures on the south exposure of tree trunks and of soil were significantly higher in thinned than unthinned stands. Light and wind also were higher in the thinned stand. Fewer mountain pine beetles were caught in pheromone-baited traps in a thinned than in an adjacent unthinned stand.

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