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Keyword: disturbance interactions

How does fire kill trees?

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 06, 2019
Each year wildland fires kill and injure trees on millions of forested hectares globally, causing both positive and negative impacts to plant and animal biodiversity, carbon storage, hydrologic processes, and ecosystem services. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of fire-caused tree mortality is important to accurately predict mortality, estimate fire-driven feedbacks to the global carbon cycle, extrapolate to novel future conditions, and implement appropriate management actions to increase forest resilience to wildfire.

Fire and tree death: Understanding and improving modeling of fire-induced tree mortality

Publications Posted on: December 04, 2018
Each year wildland fires kill and injure trees on millions of forested hectares globally, affecting plant and animal biodiversity, carbon storage, hydrologic processes, and ecosystem services. The underlying mechanisms of fire-caused tree mortality remain poorly understood, however, limiting the ability to accurately predict mortality and develop robust modeling applications, especially under novel future climates.

Characterizing spatial neighborhoods of refugia following large fires in northern New Mexico, USA

Publications Posted on: July 10, 2018
The spatial patterns resulting from large fires include refugial habitats that support surviving legacies and promote ecosystem recovery. To better understand the diverse ecological functions of refugia on burn mosaics, we used remotely sensed data to quantify neighborhood patterns of areas relatively unchanged following the 2011 Las Conchas fire.

Northern New Mexico post-fire refugia data

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
This publication contains spatial data, tabular data and scripts used to analyze the spatial patterns of refugia and associated plant communities following each of several fires in northern New Mexico. Four of the geotiff files were derived during the project (*Kernel.tif) using dNBR (delta Normalized Burn Ratio) or dNDVI (delta Normalized Difference Vegetation Index).