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Keyword: disturbances

Processed-based fire models: New tools for an era of novel conditions

Publications Posted on: June 17, 2020
The first few years of the 21st century brought a series of unprecedented natural disturbances to the southwestern U.S. A severe drought, later tagged as a “global change type drought,” triggered the mortality of 1,000 of native trees. For some species, such as the ponderosa pine, the drought was especially lethal due to high tree densities which were the outcome, in part, of the impacts of past management practices.

Ecological disturbance in the context of a changing climate: Implications for land management in Northeastern California [Chapter 6.1]

Publications Posted on: June 12, 2020
Ecosystems of the Lassen and Modoc National Forests depend on disturbance as part of the natural process. However, climate change, a source of disturbance itself, has also been changing patterns of other ecological disturbances, including the frequencies and intensities of fire, pests, and pathogens.

Integrating tribes and culture Into public land management [Chapter 5.5]

Publications Posted on: June 12, 2020
Many of the cultural traditions practiced by Native Americans were channeled from or associated with their experiences with the natural world. These traditions, in turn, served to inform land management practices that effectively maintained a sustainable ecological balance among people and land for thousands of years.

Community engagement in the decisionmaking process for public land management in Northeastern California [Chapter 5.4]

Publications Posted on: June 12, 2020
Revisions to forest plans, as directed by the U.S.

Ecosystem services and public land management [Chapter 5.3]

Publications Posted on: June 12, 2020
The concept of ecosystem services connects the activity of environmental and natural resource management to desired outcomes of human economic utility, social well-being, and cultural health. A desire for mutual sustainability between human interests and ecological cycles is inherent in the ecosystem services approach (Patterson 2014).

Demographic trends in Northeastern California [Chapter 5.2]

Publications Posted on: June 12, 2020
The anticipated changes in human populations, natural ecosystems, and the global climate are expected to impact public lands management. Land use is expected to shift due to altered productivity of local ecosystems, to overall increased human population, and to the changing market interests and cultural values.

An introduction to social, economic, and ecological factors in natural resource management of Northeastern California public lands [Chapter 5.1]

Publications Posted on: June 12, 2020
The adaptive management of forests and rangelands is directed toward achieving an ecologically sustainable landscape that contributes to social and economic sustainability. This “socioecological resilience” is a significant focus of the U.S.

Sagebrush rangelands and greater sage-grouse in Northeastern California [Chapter 4.3]

Publications Posted on: June 12, 2020
Sagebrush (Artemisia species) habitat, an intricate, species-rich mosaic of different sagebrush species and a remarkably diverse assemblage of grasses, forbs, and other shrubs, once covered about 170 million acres (69 million ha) across the Western United States (fig. 4.3.1). Noss et al. (1995) note that sagebrush habitat is an imperiled ecosystem because of its degradation, fragmentation, or removal by humans (Connelly et al.

Aquatic ecosystems, vernal pools, and other unique wetlands [Chapter 4.2]

Publications Posted on: June 12, 2020
As described in Chapter 1.1 (Dumroese, this synthesis, The Northeastern California Plateaus Bioregion Science Synthesis: Background, Rationale, and Scope), the Lassen and Modoc National Forests (hereafter the Lassen and the Modoc) share dry pine forestland that was not addressed by two prior science syntheses: Science Synthesis to Support Socioecological Resilience in the Sierra Nevada and Southern Cascade Range (hereafter, Sierra Nevada Scien

Biodiversity and representative species in dry pine forests [Chapter 4.1]

Publications Posted on: June 12, 2020
As described in Chapter 1.1 (Dumroese, this synthesis, The Northeastern California Plateaus Bioregion Science Synthesis: Background, Rationale, and Scope), the Lassen and Modoc National Forests (hereafter the Lassen and the Modoc) share dry pine forestland that was not addressed by two prior science syntheses: Science Synthesis to Support Socioecological Resilience in the Sierra Nevada and Southern Cascade Range (hereafter, Sierra Nevada Scien

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