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Keyword: ecosystem-based management

Riparian-fisheries habitat responses to late spring cattle grazing

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2012
A grazing study was conducted on a cold, mountain meadow riparian system in central Idaho in response to cattle grazing-salmonid fisheries conflicts. Six pastures were established along a 3rd order, 2 to 3 m wide stream to study the effects on fisheries habitat of no grazing, light grazing (20 to 25% use), and medium grazing (35 to 50%) during late June.

Streambank response to simulated grazing

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2012
Simulated grazing techniques were used to investigate livestock impacts on structural characteristics of streambanks. The treatments consisted of no grazing, moderate early summer grazing, moderate mid summer grazing, and heavy season-long grazing. The heavy season-long treatment resulted in a 11.5 cm depression of the streambank surface, while the moderate treatments depressed the streambank surface about 3 cm.

Studies on rock characteristics and timing of creep at selected landslide sites in Taiwan

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2012
A study was conducted to investigate the causes of and rock characteristics at three landslide sites in the Tesngwen Reservoir watershed of southern Taiwan.

Soil erosion studies in buffelgrass pastures

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2012
The introduction of exotic grasses in native rangelands to increase the production of forage has been a good alternative for the cattle industry in North America. Different studies have demonstrated that buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris L.), a plant introduced from Africa, increases the annual green forage production approximately three times in comparison to production in areas with native species in rangelands of Sonora, Mexico.

The role of dendrochronology in natural resource management

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2012
The discipline of dendrochronology, that is, development and use of time series of annual growth rings of trees, is a set of techniques by which the annual growth layers of trees may be assigned to definite calendar years. The history of changes in the trees’ environment may be reconstructed using various properties of tree rings.

Snowpack hydrology in the southwestern United States: Contributions to watershed management

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2012
Less than 10% of the annual precipitation in the Southwestern United States is recovered for use by people; most of the precipitation is lost by evapotranspiration. A large portion of the precipitation that is recovered originates on watersheds in montane forests. Even here, 80% to 90% of the precipitation is currently unavailable to downstream users.

Ecological transition in Arizona's subalpine and montane grasslands

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2012
Important components of Southwest forest ecosystem are subalpine and montane grassland communities, Grassland communities provide habitat diversity for wildlife, forage for domestic livestock and wildlife, and contribute to the visual quality of an area.

Mesquite: A multi-purpose species in two locations of San Luis Potosi, Mexico

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2012
The mesquite woodland distributed in approximately 200,000 ha in Llanos de Angostura, and Pozo del Carmen, San Luis Potosi, represents a main source of firewood, construction material, honey, and forage for the rural people that inhabit part of the lowlands of the hydrological region RH26 and RH37. Firewood collection in this region averages 142 m3 /week.

Effects of mesquite control and mulching treatments on herbage production on semiarid shrub-grasslands

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2012
Effects of complete removal of mesquite overstory, complete removal of mesquite overstory with control of post-treatment sprouts, and retention of the mesquite overstory as a control on herbage production are described. Mulching treatments included applications of a chip mulch, a commercial compost, lopped-and-scattered mesquite branchwood, and an untreated control.

Tree production in desert regions using effluent and water harvesting

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2012
Treated municipal effluent combined with water harvesting can be used for land restoration and enhancing the growth of important riparian tree species. Paired studies in Arizona are assessing the potential of growing trees using mixtures of effluent and potable water. Trees are grown in the field and in containers. Initial results from the field show high survival for four of the six species; cottonwood and willow had rapid growth.

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