You are here

Keyword: education

Ecological restoration of degraded wilderness ecosystems: Removing exotic plants and introducing prescribed fire to restore natural diversity in two National Park wilderness areas

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2008
In the United States, national parks were established mainly for their scenic qualities with an emphasis on how they looked rather than how their natural systems worked. Natural conditions in Theodore Roosevelt National Park and Buffalo National River had been degraded by decades of livestock ranching and timber harvesting prior to their designation as units of the National Park System in the late 20th century.

Managing for ecological integrity in protected wildlands: Key management challenges and research priorities in British Columbia

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2008
Protected areas have long served two masters: providing recreation, tourism and economic opportunities while conserving resources. As wild lands have become more scarce, there has been increasing realization that recreational use of protected areas is not benign. Consequently, there has been growing discussion and debate about how to reconcile human use with conservation.

Living in interesting times: Selected implications of landscape ecology for conservation science

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2008
The phrase ‘May you live in interesting times’ links well with the sub-discipline of landscape ecology. Recent research in landscape ecology and associated disciplines (for example, conservation biology) provides significant challenges to the traditional conceptions of wilderness and conservation science, and may in part reflect upon our view of contemporary society as being characterized by complexity and uncertainty.

Toda relationship with nature as an indication of ecosystem health

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2008
A relationship with nature begins at birth when the neonate is a silent participant at the elaborate rites. A number of specified plant species are used during this ceremony and a highlight is the holding of an ‘umbrella’ of Mahonia leschenaultiana over the mother and the newborn—to protect them from the destructive influence of a star called keihhtt.

Psychophysiological responses and restorative values of wilderness environments

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2008
Scenes of natural areas were used as stimuli to analyze the psychological and physiological responses of subjects while viewing wildland scenes. Attention Restoration Theory (Kaplan 1995) and theorized components of restorative environments were used as an orientation for selection of the visual stimuli.

Relationships to place in wildland resources management: Developing an effective research approach

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2008
This paper describes an approach to understanding human relationships with public lands and considering those relationships in the decision making process. This understanding is based on segmentation analysis to identify groups of local residents that have similar relationships to place (RTP) with a public wildland.

Defining values in place: A practical application for visitor management in protected areas

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2008
This paper explores a value specification option to better meet a core information need in protected area management for recreation and conservation. It does not debate the meaning or definition of values, but instead identifies a perspective on values that is aimed at meeting practical conservation management needs.

White lions: Reintroduction to their natural and spiritual homelands

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2008
The Global White Lion Protection Trust is committed to establishing the White Lions both as South Africa’s national treasure and as a global heritage. All conservation issues today are global issues. With many species, including many of the big cats, on the brink of extinction, urgent conservation measures need to be implemented to ensure their survival.

The "wilderness knot"

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2008
The word “wilderness” is beset by a tangle of meanings. This “knot” is made of five strands: philosophical, political, cultural, justice and exploitation. Wilderness has a unique philosophical position—being disliked by both Modernism and Postmodernism. Eight key criticisms of wilderness are identified, and two different meanings discussed—“wasteland” and “large natural intact area” (here shortened to “lanai”).

Crossing the divide

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2008
“This is a divide.” Dad delivered this proclamation with the verve of a discoverer. This memory from childhood frequently surfaces as I struggle to interpret the topology, the complicated relationship between the topography and cultural history of my home, the Green River Basin, that great expanse of sagebrush/ bunchgrass steppe crowned with wilderness.

Pages