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Keyword: fire

Is that tree dead? Quantifying fire-killed trees to inform salvage and forest management

Documents and Media Posted on: October 01, 2019
Science You Can Use Bulletin, Issue 36: Is That Tree Dead? Quantifying Fire-Killed Trees to Inform Salvage and Forest Management Document Type: Other Documents

Management opportunities and research priorities for Great Plains grasslands

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2019
The Great Plains Grassland Summit: Challenges and Opportunities from North to South was held April 10-11, 2018 in Denver, Colorado to provide syntheses of information about key grassland topics of interest in the Great Plains; networking and learning channels for managers, researchers, and stakeholders; and working sessions for sharing ideas about challenges and future research and management opportunities.

Snag hazard to firefighters persists long after the smoke has cleared

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 24, 2019
A new tool developed through collaboration between RMRS and researchers at Oregon State University tracks treefall through time and may just save lives. Researchers found that snag hazard to fire responders decreased significantly 10-years post fire, but that in some areas, unsafe conditions could last as long as 35 years. Maps of snag hazard risk can be used by decision makers and fire responders to reduce exposure and improve the safety of wildfire response.

Does white-tailed deer density affect tree stocking in forests of the eastern United States?

Publications Posted on: August 19, 2019
Background: White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) have increased during the past century in the USA. Greater deer densities may reduce tree regeneration, leading to forests that are understocked, where growing space is not filled completely by trees. Despite deer pressure, a major transition in eastern forests has resulted in increased tree densities.

Recent shifts in shade tolerance and disturbance traits in forests of the eastern United States

Publications Posted on: August 19, 2019
Background: Current forests of the eastern USA have the potential to succeed in composition to more shade-tolerant species. However, long-term processes of transition from fire-tolerant tree species to fire-sensitive species and effects of current land use on forests may interfere with successional progression.

Climate variability, carbon, drought and fire, in arid-semi-arid ecosystems

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 01, 2019
Using the best available science and tools, we can project the effects of today’s management actions on tomorrow’s non-forest vegetation assemblage, carbon, and productivity while considering changing climates. 

The hidden potential within soil seed banks

Science Spotlights Posted on: July 31, 2019
Wildfire and other disturbances to plant communities are becoming larger and more frequent across arid lands of the western U.S. Degradation caused by these disturbances affects the ability of these plant communities to deliver important food and shelter to wildlife. Understanding how to predict the presence of native seeds within the soil seed bank, and where there are abundant seeds of invasive species, will help land managers determine the regeneration potential within the seed bank and inform restoration planning to reestablish biodiversity and ecosystem function in disturbed areas. Wildfire and other disturbances to plant communities are becoming larger and more frequent across arid lands of the western U.S. Degradation caused by these disturbances affects the ability of these plant communities to deliver important food and shelter to wildlife. Understanding how to predict the presence of native seeds within the soil seed bank, and where there are abundant seeds of invasive species, will help land managers determine the regeneration potential within the seed bank and inform restoration planning to reestablish biodiversity and ecosystem function in disturbed areas.

Using our understanding of resilience to disturbance and resistance to invasive annual grasses to target management actions in the sagebrush biome

Projects Posted on: July 30, 2019
The concepts of ecological resilience and resistance to invasive annual grasses have been used to develop an understanding of sagebrush ecosystem response to disturbances like wildfire and management actions to reduce fuels and restore native ecosystems. A multi-scale framework that uses these concepts to prioritize areas for conservation and restoration at landscape scales and to determine effective management strategies at local scales has been developed by Chambers and her colleagues. Regional SageSTEP (Sagebrush Treatment Evaluation Project) data coupled with west-wide AIM (Assessment, Inventory and Monitoring) data provide a unique opportunity to refine the predictors of resilience and resistance and extend the existing multi-scale framework effort.

Landscape and organismal factors affecting sagebrush-seedling transplant survival after megafire restoration

Publications Posted on: July 25, 2019
Larger and more frequent disturbances are motivating efforts to accelerate recovery of foundational perennial species by focusing efforts into establishing island patches to sustain keystone species and facilitate recovery of the surrounding plant community.

A tool for projecting rangeland vegetation response to management and climate

Publications Posted on: July 01, 2019
New technologies may enhance management by enabling quantitative testing of assumptions of vegetation response to climate and management. State-and-transition simulation models can keep track of interactions that are too complicated for us to comprehend using only conceptual models. This tool takes conceptual state-and-transition models to the next level, fostering greater communication and dialogue with stakeholders.

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