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Keyword: fire effects

Echinocereus triglochidiatus, kingcup cactus

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2019
This Species Review summarizes the fire effects information and relevant ecology of kingcup cactus in North America that was available in the scientific literature as of 2018. Kingcup cactus is a small cactus native to the American Southwest. It typically grows in rocky crevices in shrublands and conifer woodlands, and fingers into desert grasslands at low elevations. Its stems occur singly or in mounds up to 4 feet in diameter.

Correction to: A case study comparison of LANDFIRE fuel loading and emissions generation on a mixed conifer forest in Northern Idaho, USA

Publications Posted on: September 14, 2019
Following publication of the original article (Hyde et al., 2015), the authors have noticed two errors in the summarizing of our results and wish to point out the following corrections.

Increasing trends in high-severity fire in the southwestern USA from 1984 to 2015

Publications Posted on: August 19, 2019
In the last three decades, over 4.1 million hectares have burned in Arizona and New Mexico and the largest fires in documented history have occurred in the past two decades. Changes in burn severity over time, however, have not been well documented in forest and woodland ecosystems in the southwestern US.

Giving ecological meaning to satellite-derived fire severity metrics across North American forests

Publications Posted on: August 06, 2019
Satellite-derived spectral indices such as the relativized burn ratio (RBR) allow fire severity maps to be produced in a relatively straightforward manner across multiple fires and broad spatial extents. These indices often have strong relationships with field-based measurements of fire severity, thereby justifying their widespread use in management and science.

Inferring energy incident on sensors in low-intensity surface fires from remotely sensed radiation and using it to predict tree stem injury

Publications Posted on: April 09, 2019
Remotely sensed radiation, attractive for its spatial and temporal coverage, offers a means of inferring energy deposition in fires (e.g. on soils, fuels and tree stems) but coordinated remote and in situ (in-flame) measurements are lacking.

The historical role of fire on the Bitterroot National Forest

Documents and Media Posted on: November 21, 2018
Presents frequencies, intensities, and influences of fire on stand structure and composition on the Bitterroot National Forest in west central Montana. Three study areas were established, each having a wide range of elevations and forest types. Findings are based upon study of nearly 900 individual fire scars on living trees, and on age-classes of shade-intolerant trees attributable to fire.   Document Type: Other Documents

Historic range of variability for upland vegetation in the Medicine Bow National Forest, Wyoming

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
An approach for synthesizing the results of ecological research pertinent to land management is the analysis of the historic range of variability (HRV) for key ecosystem variables that are affected by management activities. This report provides an HRV analysis for the upland vegetation of the Medicine Bow National Forest in southeastern Wyoming.

Historic range of variability for upland vegetation in the Bighorn National Forest, Wyoming

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
An approach for synthesizing the results of ecological research pertinent to land management is the analysis of the historic range of variability (HRV) for key ecosystem variables that are affected by management activities. This report provides an HRV analysis for the upland vegetation of the Bighorn National Forest in northcentral Wyoming.

Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 05: prescriptions and fire effects

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 5: prescriptions and fire effects. Miller, Melanie. 2004. Res. Note RMRS-RN-23-5-WWW. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 2 p.

Fire Effects Planning Framework: A user's guide

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
Each decision to suppress fire reinforces a feedback cycle in which fuels continue to accumulate, risk escalates, and the tendency to suppress fires grows (Miller and others, 2003). Existing decision-support tools focus primarily on the negative consequences of fire.

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