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Keyword: fire regime

The role of short-term weather conditions in temporal dynamics of fire regime features in mainland Spain

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
In this paper we investigate spatial-temporal associations of fire weather danger and fire regime features from 1979 to 2013.

What drives low-severity fire in the southwestern United States?

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 15, 2018
Dry conifer forests in the Western United States historically had low impact surface fires approximately every five to 30 years. Due to more than 100 years of successful fire exclusion, however, many of these forests are now denser, and therefore have a greater probability of experiencing intense fires that burn entire stands and convert forests to non-forest landscapes. What environmental conditions are necessary to promote low-severity fire in dry conifer forests? Causes and consequences of high-severity fires are increasingly being studied but little to no research has focused on factors that promote low-severity fires, until now.

What drives low-severity fire in the southwestern USA?

Publications Posted on: April 23, 2018
Many dry conifer forests in the southwestern USA and elsewhere historically (prior to the late 1800’s) experienced fairly frequent surface fire at intervals ranging from roughly five to 30 years. Due to more than 100 years of successful fire exclusion, however, many of these forests are now denser and more homogenous, and therefore they have a greater probability of experiencing stand-replacing fire compared to prior centuries.

Fire and forethought: Fire effects syntheses are a powerful tool for planning and management across resource fields

Pages Posted on: April 04, 2018
http://www.feis-crs.org/feis/The Rocky Mountain Research Station’s Fire Effects Information System (FEIS) team synthesizes information about wildland fires, their history in U.S. ecosystems, and their effects on U.S. wildland plants, lichens, and animals. Found at www.feis-crs.org/feis/, FEIS publications can be used for many purposes, including land use planning, restoration and rehabilitation planning, wildlife and range projects, and related environmental assessments and impact statements. While traditionally used for fire management decisions, FEIS can also be used for NEPA, restoration, and other planning needs by managers in other resource fields, including wildlife, plants, soils, hydrology, and roads.

Analog-based fire regime and vegetation shifts in mountainous regions of the western US

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2017
Climate change is expected to result in substantial ecological impacts across the globe. These impacts are uncertain but there is strong consensus that they will almost certainly affect fire regimes and vegetation.

Evaluating future success of whitebark pine ecosystem restoration under climate change using simulation modeling

Publications Posted on: August 08, 2017
Major declines of whitebark pine forests throughout western North America from the combined effects of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks, fire exclusion policies, and the exotic disease white pine blister rust (WPBR) have spurred many restoration actions.

Restoring whitebark pine ecosystems in the face of climate change

Publications Posted on: August 03, 2017
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests have been declining throughout their range in western North America from the combined effects of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks, fire exclusion policies, and the exotic disease white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola).

Area burned in alpine treeline ecotones reflects region-wide trends

Publications Posted on: March 17, 2017
The direct effects of climate change on alpine treeline ecotones – the transition zones between subalpine forest and non-forested alpine vegetation – have been studied extensively, but climate-induced changes in disturbance regimes have received less attention.

Surface fuel characteristics, temporal dynamics, and fire behavior of masticated mixed-conifer fuelbeds in the western U.S.

Projects Posted on: August 18, 2016
For the past three years, scientists from the RMRS Fire Sciences Lab in Missoula and the Forestry Sciences Lab in Moscow have been researching mastication as a fuel treatment in the Rocky Mountains. Specifically, they have been interested in how the materials age when they are left on the ground to decompose and how that aging affects their flammability.

Data supporting publication of fortifying the forest: thinning and burning increase resistance to a bark beetle outbreak and promote forest resilience

Datasets Posted on: June 08, 2016
This package contains data used for the publication "Fortifying the forest: thinning and burning increase resistance to a bark beetle outbreak and promote forest resilience" (Hood et al. 2016). This study includes measurements from 1996-2012 at the Lubrecht Fire-Fire Surrogate Study Site, which was established in 2000 and includes four treatments, an untreated control, prescribed burn, a thinning, and a thinning followed by prescribed burn.

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