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Keyword: fire regimes

Fire and biodiversity in the Anthropocene

Publications Posted on: November 20, 2020
Fire has been a source of global biodiversity for millions of years. However, interactions with anthropogenic drivers such as climate change, land use, and invasive species are changing the nature of fire activity and its impacts. We review how such changes are threatening species with extinction and transforming terrestrial ecosystems.

The ecology, history, ecohydrology, and management of pinyon and juniper woodlands in the Great Basin and Northern Colorado Plateau of the western United States

Publications Posted on: January 30, 2020
This synthesis reviews current knowledge of pinyon and juniper ecosystems, in both persistent and newly expanded woodlands, for managers, researchers, and the interested public. We draw from a large volume of research papers to centralize information on these semiarid woodlands. The first section includes a general description of both the Great Basin and northern Colorado Plateau.

Fire regimes of juniper communities in the Columbia and northern Great basins

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2019
This synthesis summarizes information available in the scientific literature on historical patterns and contemporary changes in fuels and fire regimes in juniper communities of the Columbia and northern Great basins. Limited evidence suggests that many presettlement juniper woodlands and savannas had open stand structures, and they typically occurred in claypan soils or shallow soils on rocky sites.

Fire regimes of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) ecosystems in Colorado: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2019
Forest management, especially restoration, is informed by understanding the dominant natural disturbance regime. In many western North American forests the keystone disturbance is fire, and much research exists characterizing various fire regime parameters, although often only one or two parameters are addressed in individual studies.

Distant neighbors: Recent wildfire patterns of the Madrean Sky Islands of southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico

Publications Posted on: August 19, 2019
Background: Information about contemporary fire regimes across the Sky Island mountain ranges of the Madrean Archipelago Ecoregion in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico can provide insight into how historical fire management and land use have influenced fire regimes, and can be used to guide fuels management, ecological restoration, and habitat conservation.

Operationalizing resilience and resistance concepts to address invasive grass-fire cycles

Publications Posted on: June 26, 2019
Plant invasions can affect fuel characteristics, fire behavior, and fire regimes resulting in invasive plant-fire cycles and alternative, self-perpetuating states that can be difficult, if not impossible, to reverse.

Influence of landscape structure, topography, and forest type on spatial variation in historical fire regimes, Central Oregon, USA

Publications Posted on: July 10, 2018
Context: In the interior Northwest, debate over restoring mixed-conifer forests after a century of fire exclusion is hampered by poor understanding of the pattern and causes of spatial variation in historical fire regimes. Objectives: To identify the roles of topography, landscape structure, and forest type in driving spatial variation in historical fire regimes in mixed-conifer forests of central Oregon.

Multidecadal trends in area burned with high severity in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness Area 1880-2012

Publications Posted on: December 12, 2017
Multidecadal trends in areas burned with high severity shape ecological effects of fires, but most assessments are limited to ~30 years of satellite data.

Fires, ecological effects of

Publications Posted on: January 31, 2017
Fire is both a natural and anthropogenic disturbance influencing the distribution, structure, and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems around the world. Many plants and animals depend on fire for their continued existence. Others species, such as rainforest plants species, are extremely intolerant of burning and need protection from fire.

Long-term, landscape patterns of past fire events in a montane ponderosa pine forest of central Colorado

Publications Posted on: December 27, 2016
Parameters of fire regimes, including fire frequency, spatial extent of burned areas, fire severity, and season of fire occurrence, influence vegetation patterns over multiple scales. In this study, centuries-long patterns of fire events in a montane ponderosa pine - Douglas-fir forest landscape surrounding Cheesman Lake in central Colorado were reconstructed from fire-scarred trees and inferences from forest stand ages.

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