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Keyword: fragmentation

Predicting connectivity, population size and genetic diversity of Sunda clouded leopards across Sabah, Borneo

Publications Posted on: June 17, 2020
The Sunda clouded leopard is vulnerable to forest loss and fragmentation. Conservation of this species requires spatially explicit evaluations of the effects of landscape patterns on genetic diversity, population size and landscape connectivity.

The effect of scale in quantifying fire impacts on species habitats

Publications Posted on: March 24, 2020
Background: Fire size and severity have increased in the western United States in recent decades, and are expected to continue to increase with warming climate. Habitats for many species are threatened by large and high-severity fires, but the effect of spatial scale on the relationship between fires and habitat modifications is poorly understood.

Higher temporal variability of forest breeding bird communities in fragmented landscapes

Publications Posted on: December 16, 2019
Understanding the relationship between animal community dynamics and landscape structure has become a priority for biodiversity conservation. In particular, predicting the effects of habitat destruction that confine species to networks of small patches is an important prerequisite to conservation plan development.

Improving habitat and connectivity model predictions with multi-scale resource selection functions from two geographic areas

Publications Posted on: April 08, 2019
Context: Habitat loss and fragmentation are the most pressing threats to biodiversity, yet assessing their impacts across broad landscapes is challenging. Information on habitat suitability is sometimes available in the form of a resource selection function model developed from a different geographical area, but its applicability is unknown until tested.

Recent and projected future wildfire trends across the ranges of three spotted owl subspecies under climate change

Publications Posted on: April 08, 2019
A major task for researchers in the twenty-first century is to predict how climate-mediated stressors such as wildfires may affect biodiversity under climate change. Previous model predictions typically did not address non-stationarity in climate-fire relationships across time and space.

Habitat fragmentation reduces genetic diversity and connectivity of the Mexican spotted owl: A simulation study using empirical resistance models

Publications Posted on: October 03, 2018
We evaluated how differences between two empirical resistance models for the same geographic area affected predictions of gene flow processes and genetic diversity for the Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida). The two resistance models represented the landscape under lowand high-fragmentation parameters.

Rangelands on the Edge: Quantifying the modification, fragmentation, and future residential development of U.S. rangelands

Publications Posted on: August 08, 2018
Rangelands are increasingly urban, subdivided, and fragmented. About 62 percent of coterminous U.S. rangelands occur on private land and are at further risk for conversion.

Managing emerging threats to spotted owls

Publications Posted on: May 10, 2018
The 3 spotted owl (Strix occidentalis) subspecies in North America (i.e., northern spotted owl [S. o. caurina], California spotted owl [S. o. occidentalis], Mexican spotted owl [S. o. lucida]) have all experienced population declines over the past century due to habitat loss and fragmentation from logging.

Genetics research identifies Bengal tiger conservation opportunities

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 20, 2017
The Bengal tiger is the world’s largest feline, which has suffered immense declines in range and population. Today, less than 10 percent of the tiger's original range is occupied with a global population of less than 7000 individuals in the wild. Understanding the factors that drive local abundance and population connectivity are critical for the conservation of this species.  

All roads lead to Iran: Predicting landscape connectivity of the last stronghold for the critically endangered Asiatic cheetah

Publications Posted on: October 06, 2016
Effective conservation solutions for small and isolated wildlife populations depend on identifying and preserving critical biological corridors and dispersal routes. With a worldwide population of ≤70 individuals, the critically endangered Asiatic cheetah Acinonyx jubatus venaticus persists in several fragmented nuclei in Iran.

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