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Keyword: genetic differentiation

Quantifying functional connectivity: The role of breeding habitat, abundance, and landscape features on range-wide gene flow in sage-grouse

Publications Posted on: May 11, 2018
Functional connectivity, quantified using landscape genetics, can inform conservation through the identification of factors linking genetic structure to landscape mechanisms.

Assessing the potential for maladaptation during active management of limber pine populations: A common garden study detects genetic differentiation in response to soil moisture in the Southern Rocky Mountains

Publications Posted on: September 15, 2016
Active management is needed to sustain healthy limber pine (Pinus flexilis E. James) forests in the Southern Rocky Mountains (henceforth, Southern Rockies), as they are threatened by the interaction of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) epidemic, climate change, and the spread of the non-native pathogen that causes white pine blister rust disease (Cronartium ribicola A. Dietr.).

Potential for maladaptation during active management of limber pine

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 12, 2016
Active management is needed to sustain healthy limber pine (Pinus flexilis) forests in the southern Rocky Mountains as they are threatened by the interaction of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) epidemic, climate change, and the spread of the non-native pathogen that causes white pine blister rust disease (Cronartium ribicola). Movement of seedlings with disease resistance from northern to southern Colorado may result in planting failure. Identification of genotypes resistant to white pine blister rust in the southern Rockies is needed at the finer scale of a national forest scale rather than the region.       

Adaptive variation in Pinus ponderosa from Intermountain regions. II. Middle Columbia River system

Publications Posted on: August 17, 2011
Seedling populations were grown and compared in common environments. Statistical analyses detected genetic differences between populations for numerous traits reflecting growth potential and periodicity of shoot elongation. Multiple regression models described an adaptive landscape in which populations from low elevations have a high growth potential while those from high elevations have a low growth potential.

Lack of genetic differentiation in aggressive and secondary bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) from Arizona

Publications Posted on: September 02, 2008
Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) play an important role as disturbance agents in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson) forests of Arizona. However, from 2001 to 2003, elevated bark beetle activity caused unprecedented levels of ponderosa pine mortality.