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Keyword: Great Basin

Factors effecting emergence of 20 Great Basin native forbs when sown at depths typical of rangeland drills

Projects Posted on: April 20, 2018
This study evaluated the effects of species, sowing depth and dormancy status, and the treatment effect of row cover on field emergence of 20 forbs native to the Great Basin. Implemented at three sites in 2013 and 2014, forb seeds were sown at four planting depths within the expected variation of the Kemmerer Rangeland or Truax Rough Rider drills.

Northeastern California plateaus bioregion science synthesis

Projects Posted on: April 20, 2018
The Lassen and Modoc National Forests are revising their Forest Plans, guided by the 2012 Planning Rule. This requires public and tribal input throughout the process and embraces the fact that ecological, social, and economic objectives are interrelated. Because ecological, social, and economic conditions have changed since the original forest plans were written and new science is available, preparing a science synthesis, guided by input from the public, tribes, and forest staffs, is the first step in a multi-step process that eventually leads to revised forest plans.

Seeding techniques for restoring sagebrush ecosystems following wildfire

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 25, 2017
Sagebrush ecosystems of the Great Basin are rapidly being converted to annual grasslands dominated by invasive weeds such as cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) which thrives following wildfire and competes with native plants. Restoring diverse plant communities containing perennial grasses, shrubs and forbs is an important priority in this region. Scientists in Boise have partnered with public and private agencies to evaluate the effectiveness of seeding techniques designed to re-establish native plants following fire.

Development of remote sensing indicators for mapping episodic die-off of an invasive annual grass (Bromus tectorum) from the Landsat archive

Publications Posted on: September 25, 2017
The exotic annual grass Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) dominates vast acreages of rangeland in the western USA, leading to increased fire frequency and ecosystem degradation that is often irreversible.

Post-fire vegetation response at the woodland-shrubland interface is mediated by the pre-fire community

Publications Posted on: July 19, 2017
Understanding the drivers of ecosystem responses to disturbance is essential for management aimed at maintaining or restoring ecosystem processes and services, especially where invasive species respond strongly to disturbance.

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Media Gallery Posted on: May 11, 2017
Native plant community restoration is a vital tool for preserving and maintaining diverse ecosystems that support wildlife and provide ecosystem functions essential to healthy human communities. The success of restoration projects depends on using plant materials that are adapted to local environmental and climatic conditions. Seed transfer guidelines and seed zones help land managers in selecting the right seed for the right place. To learn more about this see Science Spotlight: The Right Seed At The Right Place

The Right Seed At The Right Place

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 11, 2017
Native plant community restoration is a vital tool for preserving and maintaining diverse ecosystems that support wildlife and provide ecosystem functions essential to healthy human communities. The success of restoration projects depends on using plant materials that are adapted to local environmental and climatic conditions. Seed transfer guidelines and seed zones help land managers in selecting the right seed for the right place.

Great Basin Factsheet Series 2016 - Information and tools to restore and conserve Great Basin ecosystems

Publications Posted on: November 17, 2016
Land managers are responsible for developing effective strategies for conserving and restoring Great Basin ecosystems in the face of invasive species, conifer expansion, and altered fire regimes. A warming climate is magnifying the effects of these threats and adding urgency to implementation of management practices that will maintain or improve ecosystem functioning.

Historic fire regime forensics: Deciphering drivers and variability from tree rings

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 18, 2016
Proper management of naturally forested landscapes requires an understanding of the temporal and spatial patterns in which key disturbance processes are manifest and their effects on species composition and structure. Linked fire and forest histories constructed from tree-ring evidence provide valuable information about drivers of fire occurrence and about the variability and interactions of fire regimes and vegetation on heterogeneous landscapes.

Surface fuel characteristics, temporal dynamics, and fire behavior of masticated mixed-conifer fuelbeds in the western U.S.

Projects Posted on: August 18, 2016
For the past three years, scientists from the RMRS Fire Sciences Lab in Missoula and the Forestry Sciences Lab in Moscow have been researching mastication as a fuel treatment in the Rocky Mountains. Specifically, they have been interested in how the materials age when they are left on the ground to decompose and how that aging affects their flammability.

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