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Keyword: habitat suitability model

FIRE-BIRD: A GIS tool for applying habitat suitability models to inform land management planning

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 04, 2019
To conserve and promote biological diversity, land managers must identify suitable habitat for species of conservation concern. Managers can then restrict potentially detrimental activities (e.g., salvage logging) to areas of lower habitat suitability, and target beneficial activities (e.g., restoration) where habitat suitability is higher. We developed FIRE-BIRD, an ArcGIS tool, to map habitat suitability for disturbance-associated woodpeckers of conservation concern to inform postfire management and restoration treatments in dry mixed-conifer forests. 

FIRE-BIRD: Habitat suitability model application tools for disturbance-associated woodpeckers

Tools Posted on: July 25, 2019
FIRE-BIRD is an ArcGIS spatial tool for applying habitat suitability models to generate maps that inform forest management planning. This tool focuses on disturbance-associated woodpecker species of conservation concern.

FIRE-BIRD: A GIS-based toolset for applying habitat suitability models to inform land management planning

Publications Posted on: June 20, 2019
Habitat suitability models can inform forest management for species of conservation concern. Models quantify relationships between known species locations and environmental attributes, which are used to identify areas most likely to support species of concern. Managers can then limit negative human impacts in areas of high suitability or conduct habitat improvements in areas of marginal suitability.

Transferability of habitat suitability models for nesting woodpeckers associated with wildfire

Publications Posted on: October 25, 2016
Following wildfire, forest managers are challenged with meeting both socioeconomic demands (e.g., salvage logging) and mandates requiring habitat conservation for disturbance-associated wildlife (e.g., woodpeckers).

White-headed woodpecker nesting ecology after wildfire

Publications Posted on: September 17, 2010
Within forests susceptible to wildfire and insect infestations, land managers need to balance dead tree removal and habitat requirements for wildlife species associated with snags.

Fine-scale analysis of Mount Graham red squirrel habitat following disturbance

Publications Posted on: November 16, 2009
Habitat destruction and degradation are major factors in reducing abundance, placing populations and species in jeopardy. Monitoring changes to habitat and identifying locations of habitat for a species, after disturbance, can assist mitigation of the effects of humancaused or -amplified habitat disturbance.