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Keyword: habitat use

Functional responses in habitat selection: Clarifying hypotheses and interpretations

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
A fundamental challenge in habitat ecology and management is understanding the mechanisms generating animal distributions. Studies of habitat selection provide a lens into such mechanisms, but are often limited by unrealistic assumptions. For example, most studies assume that habitat selection is constant with respect to the availability of resources, such that habitat use remains proportional to availability.

Mexican spotted owl home range and habitat use in pine-oak forest: Implications for forest management

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
To better understand the habitat relationships of the Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida), and how such relationships might influence forest management, we studied home-range and habitat use of radio-marked owls in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) Gambel oak (Quercus gambelii) forest.

Multi-scale habitat relationships of snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) in the mixed conifer landscape of the Northern Rockies, USA: Cross-scale effects of horizontal cover with implications for forest management

Publications Posted on: January 10, 2017
Snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) are an ecologically important herbivore because they modify vegetation through browsing and serve as a prey resource for multiple predators. We implemented a multiscale approach to characterize habitat relationships for snowshoe hares across the mixed conifer landscape of the northern Rocky Mountains, USA.

Habitat selection by Mexican Spotted Owls in Northern Arizona

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
We compared use of seven habitat types to availability of those types within the home ranges of eight radio-tagged Mexican Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis lucida). When all habitat types were considered simultaneously, habitat use differed from habitat availability for each owl. Patterns of habitat use varied among individuals and with respect to activity.

Habitat use by mountain quail in Northern California

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
We studied habitat use by Mountain Quail (Oreortyx pictus) at four sites in northern California. Vegetative cover types (macrohabitats) were used in proportion to availability. Significant microhabitat variables which distinguished used from available microhabitat structure included proximity to water and tall, dense shrubs.

Comparative habitat use of sympatric Mexican spotted and great horned owls

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
To provide information on comparative habitat use, we studied radiotagged Mexican spotted owls (Strix occidentalis lucida: n = 13) and great horned owls (Bubo virginianus: n = 4) in northern Arizona. Home-range size (95% adaptive kernel estimate) did not differ significantly between species during either the breeding or nonbreeding season.

Diel habitat partitioning by bull charr and cutthroat trout during fall and winter in Rocky Mountain streams

Publications Posted on: May 19, 2015
We used underwater observation to determine diel habitat partitioning between bull charr, Salvelinus confluentus, and cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarki, during fall and winter (0.1-8.3°C) in two Rocky Mountain streams that differed in habitat availability. The majority (>70%) of both species emerged from concealment cover at night, though bull charr exhibited a greater tendency for nocturnal behavior than cutthroat trout.

Habitat use data for male ruffed grouse in the Black Hills National Forest

Datasets Posted on: March 27, 2015
Ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) are native upland game birds and a management indicator species (MIS) for aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the Black Hills National Forest in South Dakota and Wyoming. Drumming surveys were conducted in the spring of 2007 and 2008 to locate used and unused male ruffed grouse sites from which habitat characteristics were compared at increasing spatial scales of 200 meters (m), 400 m, 1600 m, and 4800 m.

Multi-scale habitat use of male ruffed grouse in the Black Hills National Forest

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2014
Ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) are native upland game birds and a management indicator species (MIS) for aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the Black Hills National Forest (Black Hills). Our objective was to assess resource selection of male ruffed grouse to identify the most appropriate scale to manage for aspen and ruffed grouse in the Black Hills.

Fisher research in the US Rocky Mountains: A critical overview

Publications Posted on: October 01, 2013
In this talk we review the recent fisher research and monitoring efforts that have occurred throughout Idaho and Montana in past 2 decades. We begin this talk with a summary of the habitat relationship work that has examined fisher habitat use at multiple scales.

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