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Keyword: invasive plants

‘Chem herding’ to improve biological control of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) in the Northern Rockies

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 08, 2019
Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) refers to the complex of exotic invasive shrubs and trees (four species and their hybrids) now considered the third most prevalent woody riparian taxonomic group in the western United States. Defoliation by large multivoltine populations of the Northern tamarisk beetle Diorhabda carinulata has successfully reduced extensive saltcedar infestations in the southwestern United States. Behavioral manipulation of insects with semiochemicals such as aggregation pheromones can be used to intensify herbivory, even in the Northern Rockies where beetle population densities are inherently low, to the extent that the target weed species is negatively affected at a population level.

Development of remote sensing indicators for mapping episodic die-off of an invasive annual grass (Bromus tectorum) from the Landsat archive

Publications Posted on: September 25, 2017
The exotic annual grass Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) dominates vast acreages of rangeland in the western USA, leading to increased fire frequency and ecosystem degradation that is often irreversible.

Invasive Species Science Update (No. 8)

Publications Posted on: December 27, 2016
Invasive Species Science Updates are designed to keep managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, as well as highlight breaking news related to invasive species issues.

Invasive Species Science Update (No. 7)

Publications Posted on: December 27, 2016
Invasive Species Science Updates are designed to keep managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, as well as highlight breaking news related to invasive species issues.

Linking wilderness research and management-volume 4. Understanding and managing invasive plants in wilderness and other natural areas: an annotated reading list

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Nonnative invasive plants are altering ecosystems around the world with alarming speed. They outcompete native plants and ultimately change the composition and function of the ecosystems they invade. This poses a particular problem in wilderness and other natural areas that are set aside to maintain natural conditions.

Invasive Plants — Issues, Challenges, and Discoveries Webinar Series

Events Posted on: March 15, 2016
The USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station hosted a webinar series, Invasive Plants — Issues, Challenges, and Discoveries Webinar Series, to provide attendees with cutting-edge information about invasive plants and their management. This webinar series was sponsored by the Station’s Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program.

Celebrating 30 years of the Fire Effects Information System (FEIS)

Science Spotlights Posted on: November 10, 2015
Thirty years ago, Rocky Mountain Research Station scientist William (Bill) Fischer proposed a highly innovative computer system to provide managers with information about the effects of prescribed fire. Technology has changed radically since Fischer originally envisioned a computer program to provide fire effects information electronically. The FEIS user interface now enables readers to search using many criteria, including maps, and it connects information from all three FEIS products - Species Reviews, Fire Studies, and Fire Regimes.

Unwanted side effects of roads are invasive species

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 22, 2015
Resource managers are using burning and thinning treatments more and more in western forests to manage the infestation of insects and disease as well as to reduce wildfire hazards. Unfortunately, these treatments can trigger the invasion and spread of invasive plants, which can thwart restoration efforts. A recently published, long-term Forest Service study conducted at the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (TCEF) in Montana helps shed some light on the spread of invasive plants.

Plant invasions: How do mild-mannered plants transform into superinvaders?

Media Gallery Posted on: July 30, 2015
(Click on an image to see it in full view.)

Plant invasions: How do mild-mannered plants transform into superinvaders?

Projects Posted on: May 19, 2015
For over 10 years, Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists and their partners have engaged in research to 1) determine the causes underlying plant invasions, 2) identify invader impacts in native systems, and 3) improve the efficacy of invasive plant mitigation efforts.

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