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Keyword: landscape management

Plant community responses to livestock grazing: An assessment of alternative management practices in a semiarid grassland

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
One of the most prevalent land-use practices in the American Southwest, and one of the most contentious issues among land-use policymakers, is the grazing of domestic livestock. In an effort to contribute scientific understanding to this debate, we have designed experiments comparing the effects of alternative grazing regimes on plant communities.

Effect of restoration thinning on mycorrhizal fungal propagules in a northern Arizona ponderosa pine forest: Preliminary results

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
The inoculum potential for arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi were investigated in thinned and uncut control stands in a northern Arizona ponderosa pine forest. A corn bioassay was used to determine the relative amount of infective propagules of AM fungi, and a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) bioassay was used to determine the relative amount of infective propagules of EM fungi.

Seeding versus natural regeneration: A comparison of vegetation change following thinning and burning in ponderosa pine

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
The decision whether to seed with native species following restoration treatments should be based on existing vegetation, species present in or absent from the soil seed bank, past management history, microclimate conditions and soils. We installed three permanent monitoring plots in two areas (total 18.6 ha) at Mt. Trumbull, AZ. Trees were thinned and the sites burned in 1996 and 1997.

Six-year changes in mortality and crown condition of old-growth ponderosa pines in ecological restoration treatments at the G. A. Pearson Natural Area

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
Ecological restoration treatments using thinning and prescribed burning have been proposed to reverse the decline of old-growth ponderosa pines in the Southwest. However, long-term data on the effectiveness of such treatments are lacking. In 1993-1994, two ecological restoration treatments and a control were established at the G. A. Pearson Natural Area (GPNA) near Flagstaff, AZ.

Fire Process Research Natural Areas: Managing research and restoration of dynamic ecosystem processes

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
Since 1992 a collaborative group of fire scientists, forest conservationists, and Federal resource specialists have been developing proposals for a Research Natural Area (RNA) in the Warner Creek Fire area on the Willamette National Forest in Oregon.

The effects of a low intensity fire on a mixed conifer forest in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
Prescribed fire was used to reduce fuel loading and tree densities. Permanent vegetation and fuel loading plots were randomly established within prescribed burn units. The plots were established in 1995 and were sampled, immediately postburn (within 1 month of the fire), 1 year after the burn, and 2 years after the burn. The prescribed burns were implemented in August of 1995.

Effects of low intensity prescribed fires on ponderosa pine forests in wilderness areas of Zion National Park, Utah

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
Vegetation and fuel loading plots were monitored and sampled in wilderness areas treated with prescribed fire. Changes in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest structure tree species and fuel loading are presented. Plots were randomly stratified and established in burn units in 1995.

Effect of prescribed burning on mortality of resettlement ponderosa pines in Grand Canyon National Park

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) trees established before Euro-American settlement are becoming rare on the landscape. Prescribed fire is the prime tool used to restore ponderosa pine ecosystems, but can cause high mortality in presettlement ponderosa pines. This study uses retrospective techniques to estimate mortality from prescribed burns within Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP).

Potential fire behavior is reduced following forest restoration treatments

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
Potential fire behavior was compared under dry, windy weather conditions in 12 ponderosa pine stands treated with alternative thinning prescriptions in the wildland/urban interface of Flagstaff, Arizona. Prior to thinning, stands averaged 474 trees/ acre, 158 ft2/acre basal area, crown bulk density 0.0045 lb/ft3, and crown base height 19.2 ft.

Landscape patterns of montane forest age structure relative to fire history at Cheesman Lake in the Colorado Front Range

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
Lack of Euro-American disturbance, except fire suppression, has preserved the patterns of forest structure that resulted from the presettlement disturbance regime in a ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir landscape at Cheesman Lake in the Colorado Front Range. A mixed-severity fire regime and variable timing of tree recruitment created a heterogeneous forest age structure with considerable old growth.

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