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Keyword: Long Valley Experimental Forest

Early thinning experiments established by the Fort Valley Experimental Forest

Publications Posted on: March 25, 2009
Between 1925 and 1936, the Fort Valley Experimental Forest (FVEF) scientists initiated a study to examine a series of forest thinning experiments in second growth ponderosa pine stands in Arizona and New Mexico. These early thinning plots furnished much of the early background for the development of methods used in forest management in the Southwest.

Revisiting Pearson's climate and forest type studies on the Fort Valley Experimental Forest

Publications Posted on: March 25, 2009
Five weather station sites were established in 1916 by Fort Valley personnel along an elevational gradient from the Experimental Station to near the top of the San Francisco Peaks to investigate the factors that controlled and limited forest types. The stations were located in the ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, limber pine, Engelmann spruce, and Engelmann spruce/ bristlecone pine ("timberline") forest types.

Characteristics of buckbrush shrubs exposed to herbivores after seven years of protection

Publications Posted on: March 25, 2009
In dense ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) forests of northern Arizona, forage limitations may lead to severe herbivory by large ungulates on certain plant species. In 1999, we fenced 76 buckbrush (Ceanothus fendleri Gray) shrubs to protect them from herbivores and study growth and reproduction in response to forest restoration treatments implemented on the Fort Valley Experimental Forest.

Removing the tree-ring width biological trend using expected basal area increment

Publications Posted on: March 25, 2009
One of the main elements of dendrochronological standardization is the removal of the biological trend, i.e., the progressive decline of ring width along a cross-sectional radius that is mostly caused by the corresponding increase in stem diameter over time. A very common option for removing this biological trend is to fit a modified negative exponential curve to the ring-width measurements.

The Hill plots: A rare long-term vegetation study

Publications Posted on: March 25, 2009
One legacy of the Fort Valley Experimental Forest is the number and quality of long-term studies associated with it. One such study is the "Hill plots," which began in 1912 and is still being actively studied. Livestock exclosures were built at five sites to examine vegetation recovery when protected from livestock grazing. Sites span a range of soil types and elevations.

"Growing trees backwards": Description of a stand reconstruction model

Publications Posted on: March 25, 2009
We describe an individual-tree model that uses contemporary measurements to "grow trees backward" and reconstruct past tree diameters and stand structure in ponderosa pine dominated stands of the Southwest. Model inputs are contemporary structural measurements of all snags, logs, stumps, and living trees, and radial growth measurements, if available.

Forty years later at Taylor Woods: Merging the old and new

Publications Posted on: March 25, 2009
The Taylor Woods "Levels-of-Growing-Stock" study was established in 1962 to create a replicated ponderosa pine density experiment for the Southwest, making a valuable addition to research in the Fort Valley Experimental Forest. Basal area treatments ranged from 5-20 m2/ha (19-80 ft2/ac) when installed, designed as growing stock levels 30/40, 60, 80, 100, 120 and 150.

Plant recruitment in a northern Arizona ponderosa pine forest: Testing seed- and leaf litter-limitation hypotheses

Publications Posted on: March 25, 2009
Seed availability and leaf litter limit plant establishment in some ecosystems. To evaluate the hypothesis that these factors limit understory plant recruitment in Pinus ponderosa forests, I conducted a seeding and litter removal experiment at six thinned sites in the Fort Valley Experimental Forest, northern Arizona.

Memories of Fort Valley from 1938 to 1942

Publications Posted on: March 25, 2009
This delightful essay records Frank Wadsworth's early forestry career at FVEF in the late 1930s. Frank married Margaret Pearson, G.A. and May Pearson's daughter, in 1941. Pearson believed Frank could not continue to work for him because of nepotism rules, so Frank and Margaret moved to San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1942 where Frank continued his forestry career.

The Fort Valley Experimental Forest, ponderosa pine, and wildlife habitat research

Publications Posted on: March 25, 2009
Wildlife research at the Fort Valley Experimental Forest began with studies to determine how to control damage by wildlife and livestock to ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) reproduction and tree growth. Studies on birds, small mammals, and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) browsing were initiated in the early 1930s and 1940s but these were short term efforts to develop control techniques.

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