You are here

Keyword: mountain pine beetle

Woodpecker nest survival, density, and a pine beetle outbreak

Publications Posted on: August 23, 2019
Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks in western North American coniferous forests are increasing in size and severity. An understanding of wildlife population responses to pine beetle outbreaks is needed to inform habitat conservation strategies.

Mountain pine beetle in Colorado: A story of changing forests

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 21, 2019
This research presents synthesis of recent research on the effects of mountain pine beetle outbreaks in Colorado’s lodgepole pine forests. The work updates users, scientists, and the public on research finds on how mountain pine beetle has affected a suite of ecosystem services. 

Will climate warming be good or bad for mountain pine beetles?

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 21, 2019
Insects are expected to be favored by climate change as warm winters increase survival and warm summers speed up development. Many species, however, have adapted to seasonal aspects of their environment and warming that occurs too fast may disrupt their way of life. A research-based temperature-driven model suggests that within the next few decades mountain pine beetle range retraction may occur in the United States as its lifecycle is disrupted by excessive warming. 

Ips typographus and Dendroctonus ponderosae models project thermal suitability for intra- and inter-continental establishment in a changing climate

Publications Posted on: July 08, 2019
Climate change is altering legacies of native insect-caused disturbances and contributing to non-native invasions globally. Many insect fitness traits are temperature dependent and projected climatic changes are expected to cause continued alterations in insect-caused tree mortality, with uncertain consequences for forest ecosystems and their management.

Invasive Species Science Update (No. 11)

Publications Posted on: June 10, 2019
In this issue, we cover new research ranging from using chili powder to improve native plant restoration, searching for a link between exotic white pine blister rust and mountain pine beetle resistance in limber pine, identifying how melting arctic sea ice could open new pathways for invasive species introductions, and research into a relatively newly established biocontrol agent for rush skeletonweed.

Mountain pine beetle in colorado: A story of changing forests

Publications Posted on: December 06, 2018
The mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is one of the most prevalent disturbance agents in western conifer forests. It utilizes various species of pines (Pinus spp.) as host trees. Eruptive populations can cause extensive tree mortality. Since the late 1990s, extensive outbreaks have occurred from the southern Rockies to British Columbia. In Colorado, lodgepole pine (P. contorta) forests have been the most affected.

Recovering from the mountain pine beetle

Publications Posted on: November 20, 2018
Beginning in the late 1990s, the pine forests of Montana began to experience the largest mountain pine beetle outbreak in recorded history. Large swaths of forests began to turn red, then gray as the beetles ate their way through Pacific Northwest stands. At their peak in 2009, this native insect infested nearly 3.7 million acres statewide, leaving dead or dying trees in their wake.

Impacts of the mountain pine beetle on sawmill operations, costs, and product values in Montana

Publications Posted on: November 20, 2018
Over the past 20 years, the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) has caused considerable tree mortality across the Rocky Mountain region of the western United States. Although the operational and cost impacts of dead timber are generally well known in the sawmill industry, there remains a need to better understand the impact of large-scale outbreaks on the industry at local and regional scales.

Pages