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Keyword: old-growth

Understanding and replicating historical spatial patterns is important to create forests that are resilient to fire and other disturbances

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 21, 2019
Researchers are increasingly recognizing that ponderosa pine forests naturally occur in clumps of trees with isolated single trees in a matrix of non-forested openings. Turns out that this spatial pattern is important in sustaining ecological processes such as fire spread, tree growth and regeneration, and creates biodiversity and wildlife habitat. Yet, most past studies have examined spatial patterns on small plots, which underestimates the sizes of tree groups and openings.

Remnant old-growth ponderosa pine forests provide insights on spatial patterns

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 06, 2019
Researchers are increasingly recognizing that ponderosa pine forests naturally occur in clumps of trees with isolated single trees in a matrix of non-forested openings. It turns out that this spatial pattern is important in sustaining ecological processes such as fire spread, tree growth and regeneration, and creates biodiversity and wildlife habitat. Yet, most past studies have examined spatial patterns on small plots, which underestimates the sizes of tree groups and openings.  

Doughnuts don’t make trees fatter

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 06, 2019
Large, old trees, often called legacy trees, serve a foundational role in old-growth forests. Restoration efforts to improve vigor of legacy trees and decrease risk to high-intensity wildland fire and drought-mediated insect mortality often include reductions in stand density. However, sometimes regulatory and social constraints limit stand-level thinning options by requiring maintenance of closed canopies.

A reconceptualization of open oak and pine ecosystems of eastern North America using a forest structure spectrum

Publications Posted on: November 15, 2018
We present a reconceptualization of forests in eastern North America by differentiating the ecological characteristics of open oak (Quercus) and pine (Pinus) forests from closed successional and oldgrowth forests. Despite historical abundance of savannas and woodlands, the fundamental ecology of open forest ecosystems remains ill-defined when compared to either closed forests or grasslands.

Radial and stand-level thinning treatments: 15-year growth response of legacy ponderosa and Jeffrey pine trees

Publications Posted on: December 14, 2017
Restoration efforts to improve vigor of large, old trees and decrease risk to high-intensity wildland fire and drought-mediated insect mortality often include reductions in stand density. We examined 15-year growth response of old ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi) trees in northeastern California, U.S.A. to two levels of thinning treatments compared to an untreated (control) area.

The California spotted owl: a technical assessment of its current status

Publications Posted on: April 01, 2013
This report is based an the Final Repart submitted on May 8, 1992 by the Technical Assessment Team to the interagency Steering Committee for the California Spotted Owl Assessment. The 13 chapters cover the assessment of the current status of the California spotted owl, its biology and habitat use, and forests where the subspecies occurs in the Sierra Nevada and southern California.

Mitigating old tree mortality in long-unburned, fire-dependent forests: a synthesis

Publications Posted on: May 10, 2010
This report synthesizes the literature and current state of knowledge pertaining to reintroducing fire in stands where it has been excluded for long periods and the impact of these introductory fires on overstory tree injury and mortality. Only forested ecosystems in the United States that are adapted to survive frequent fire are included.

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