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Keyword: pheromone

Beetle pheromones and maple volatiles reduce spruce beetle attacks on spruce trees

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 21, 2019
The spruce beetle is the most significant mortality agent of spruce in western North America, and management options are limited. In cooperation with FHP partners, a novel combination of a beetle-produced pheromone (MCH) and compounds from a non-host (maple) tree (AKB) were shown to be repellent to spruce beetles. High-release rate MCH-AKB devices that are attached to live spruce can reduce spruce beetle attacks on individual trees and small groups of trees.

3-Methylcyclohex-2-en-1-one for area and individual tree protection against spruce beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) attack in the southern Rocky Mountains

Publications Posted on: September 25, 2017
We tested 3-methylcyclohex-2-en-1-one (MCH) and an Acer kairomone blend (AKB) as repellent semiochemicals for area and single tree protection to prevent spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis Kirby) attacks at locations in Utah and New Mexico.

Semiochemical repellents reduce spruce beetle infestations

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 23, 2017
The spruce beetle is the most significant mortality agent of spruce in western North America. Management options are limited but an effective semiochemical repellent could be economically and environmentally advantageous, compared to insecticide applications, for protection single trees and small stands.

Lethal trap trees and semiochemical repellents as area host protection strategies for spruce beetle in Utah

Projects Posted on: August 18, 2016
Spruce beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) is the major disturbance agent of North American spruce, but current methods to suppress beetle populations vary in scale efficacy, cost, and environmental impact. A high-dose, high release MCH dispenser was found to be an effective area treatment for protection against spruce beetle attacks. Lethal trap trees and semiochemical repellents could provide managers with new tools for protecting hosts trees from spruce beetle attacks.

Lethal trap trees and semiochemical repellents as area host protection strategies for spruce beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) in Utah

Publications Posted on: August 16, 2016
We tested lethal trap trees and repellent semiochemicals as area treatments to protect host trees from spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis Kirby) attacks. Lethal trap tree treatments ("spray treatment") combined a spruce beetle bait with carbaryl treatment of the baited spruce.

Applied chemical ecology of the mountain pine beetle

Publications Posted on: June 27, 2014
Mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a primary agent of forest disturbance in western North America. Episodic outbreaks occur at the convergence of favorable forest age and size class structure and climate patterns. Recent outbreaks have exceeded the historic range of variability of D. ponderosae-caused tree mortality affecting ecosystem goods and services at broad spatial scales.

A test of high-dose verbenone for stand-level protection of lodgepole and whitebark pine from mountain pine beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) attacks

Publications Posted on: May 21, 2013
The effcacy of verbenone as a stand-level protectant against mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, attacks was tested in lodgepole and whitebark pine stands at five geographically separated sites, including three consecutive years at one site. Forty and 20 high-dose pouches, with a verbenone emission rate up to 50 mg/d per pouch, were spaced in a grid pattern throughout 0.40-ha plots, replicated up to six times at each site.

Microclimate: an alternative to tree vigor as a basis for mountain pine beetle infestations

Publications Posted on: May 02, 2013
Thinning lodgepole pine stands increased light intensity, wind movement, insolation, and temperature. Temperatures on the south exposure of tree trunks and of soil were significantly higher in thinned than unthinned stands. Light and wind also were higher in the thinned stand. Fewer mountain pine beetles were caught in pheromone-baited traps in a thinned than in an adjacent unthinned stand.