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Keyword: plant communities

Habitat and growth of ponderosa pine seedlings 11-16 years after fire

Science Spotlights Posted on: November 02, 2020
Ponderosa pine seedling establishment can be constrained following especially large, high-severity wildfires. Young seedlings face high mortality levels in the first few years and remain vulnerable to the next fire until they are taller. Understanding attributes associated with the growth of naturally regenerating seedlings that survive 10+ years postfire is useful in developing post-fire management strategies.

Range inventory

Publications Posted on: January 22, 2020
The primary objective of the research at the Manitou site was to determine at what classification level Skylab photographic products, or their equivalent, can be used for plant community classification in a central Colorado mountainous area.

Restoring Western Ranges and Wildlands, vol. 2

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This work, in three volumes, provides background on philosophy, processes, plant materials selection, site preparation, and seed and seeding equipment for revegetating disturbed rangelands, emphasizing use of native species.

Restoring Western Ranges and Wildlands, vol. 1

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This work, in three volumes, provides background on philosophy, processes, plant materials selection, site preparation, and seed and seeding equipment for revegetating disturbed rangelands, emphasizing use of native species.

Restoring Western Ranges and Wildlands, vol. 3

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This work, in three volumes, provides background on philosophy, processes, plant materials selection, site preparation, and seed and seeding equipment for revegetating disturbed rangelands, emphasizing use of native species.

Abiotic drivers of Chihuahuan Desert plant communities

Publications Posted on: September 28, 2014
Within grasslands, precipitation, fire, nitrogen (N) addition, and extreme temperatures influence community composition and ecosystem function. The differential influences of these abiotic factors on Chihuahuan Desert grassland communities was examined within the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, located in central New Mexico, U.S.A.

The effect of fire on soil properties

Publications Posted on: October 17, 2012
Fire affects nutrient cycling and the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils occupied by western montane forests. Combustion of litter and soil organic matter (OM) increases the availability of some nutrients, although others are volatilized (for example, N, P, S). Soil OM loss also affects cation exchange capacity, organic chelation, aggregate stability, macro pore space, infiltration, and soil microorganisms.

Forest habitat types of Montana

Publications Posted on: July 30, 2012
A land-classification system based upon potential natural vegetation is presented for the forests of Montana. It is based on an intensive 4-year study and reconnaissance sampling of about 1,500 stands. A hierarchical classification of forest sites was developed using the habitat type concept. A total of 9 climax series, 64 habitat types, and 37 additional phases of habitat types are defined.

Forest habitat types of central Idaho

Publications Posted on: February 14, 2012
A land-classification system based upon potential natural vegetation is presented for the forests of central Idaho. It is based on reconnaissance sampling of about 800 stands. A hierarchical taxonomic classification of forest sites was developed using the habitat type concept. A total of eight climax series, 64 habitat types, and 55 additional phases of habitat types are defined and described.

Does seeding after severe forest fires in western USA mitigate negative impacts on soils and plant communities?

Publications Posted on: October 26, 2011
Broadcast seeding is one of the most widely used post-wildfire emergency response treatments intended to reduce soil erosion, increase vegetative ground cover, and minimize establishment and spread of non-native plant species. However, seeding treatments can also have negative effects such as competition with recovering native plant communities and inadvertent introduction of invasive species.

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