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Keyword: plant community

Chapter 10: Fire and nonnative invasive plants in the Northwest Coastal bioregion

Publications Posted on: April 16, 2009
This chapter discusses the relationship between fire (natural and prescribed) and nonnative plant species within major vegetation communities of the Northwest Coastal bioregion, and specifically addresses the role of fire in promoting nonnative species invasions, the effects of nonnative species on fire regimes, and usefulness of fire as a management tool for controlling nonnative species.

Chapter 9: Fire and nonnative invasive plants in the Southwest Coastal bioregion

Publications Posted on: April 16, 2009
The Southwest Coastal bioregion is closely aligned with the geographic boundaries of the California Floristic Province. Excluding Great Basin and Mojave Desert plant communities, the bioregion is defined by the Transverse Ranges of Southern California, the eastern edge of the Sierra Nevada and southern Cascade Ranges, and the northern edge of the Siskiyou Mountains of southern Oregon.

Chapter 8: Fire and nonnative invasive plants in the Interior West bioregion

Publications Posted on: April 16, 2009
The Interior West bioregion is bounded on the east by the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains from Canada south to Mexico and on the west by the eastern foothills of the Cascade Range in Washington and Oregon and the eastern foothills of the Sierra Nevada in California.

Chapter 7: Fire and nonnative invasive plants in the Central bioregion

Publications Posted on: April 16, 2009
The Central bioregion is a vast area, stretching from Canada to Mexico and from the eastern forests to the Rocky Mountains, dominated by grasslands and shrublands, but inclusive of riparian and other forests. This bioregion has been impacted by many human-induced changes, particularly relating to agricultural practices, over the past 150 years.

Chapter 6: Fire and nonnative invasive plants in the Southeast bioregion

Publications Posted on: April 16, 2009
This chapter identifies major concerns about fire and nonnative invasive plants in the Southeast bioregion.

Chapter 5: Fire and nonnative invasive plants in the Northeast bioregion

Publications Posted on: April 16, 2009
The Northeast bioregion extends from Maine to Maryland and northern Virginia, south along the northwest slope of the Appalachians to Tennessee, and west to the ecotone between prairie and woodland from Minnesota to northeastern Oklahoma. It is composed of a wide variety of landforms and vegetation types.

Chapter 4: Use of fire to manage populations of nonnative invasive plants

Publications Posted on: April 16, 2009
It may be impossible to overstate the complexity of relationships among wildland ecosystems, fires, and nonnative invasives. Strategies for managing these relationships are similarly complex; they require information on local plant phenology, ability to produce various levels of fire severity within burns, willingness to combine fire with other management techniques, and systematic monitoring to improve effectiveness.

Chapter 3: Plant invasions and fire regimes

Publications Posted on: April 16, 2009
The alteration of fire regimes is one of the most significant ways that plant invasions can affect ecosystems (Brooks and others 2004; D'Antonio 2000; D'Antonio and Vitousek 1992; Vitousek 1990).

Chapter 2: Effects of fire on nonnative invasive plants and invasibility of wildland ecosystems

Publications Posted on: April 16, 2009
Considerable experimental and theoretical work has been done on general concepts regarding nonnative species and disturbance, but experimental research on the effects of fire on nonnative invasive species is sparse. We begin this chapter by connecting fundamental concepts from the literature of invasion ecology to fire.

Chapter 1: Fire and nonnative invasive plants-introduction

Publications Posted on: April 16, 2009
Fire is a process integral to the functioning of most temperate wildland ecosystems. Lightning-caused and anthropogenic fires have influenced the vegetation of North America profoundly for millennia (Brown and Smith 2000; Pyne 1982b).

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