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Keyword: plant invasions

Resilience and resistance in sagebrush ecosystems are associated with seasonal soil temperature and water availability

Publications Posted on: October 03, 2018
Invasion and dominance of exotic grasses and increased fire frequency threaten native ecosystems worldwide. In the Great Basin region of the western United States, woody and herbaceous fuel treatments are implemented to decrease the effects of wildfire and increase sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystem resilience to disturbance and resistance to exotic annual grasses.

Invasive Species Science Update (No. 8)

Publications Posted on: December 27, 2016
Invasive Species Science Updates are designed to keep managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, as well as highlight breaking news related to invasive species issues.

Invasive Species Science Update (No. 7)

Publications Posted on: December 27, 2016
Invasive Species Science Updates are designed to keep managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, as well as highlight breaking news related to invasive species issues.

Invasive Species Science Update (No. 6)

Publications Posted on: April 18, 2013
The sixth issue of the Rocky Mountain Research Station's (RMRS) Invasive Species Science Update is now complete. Published approximately once per year, this newsletter keeps managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, and covers breaking news related to invasive species issues.

A novel plant-fungal mutualism associated with fire

Publications Posted on: January 17, 2012
Bromus tectorum, or cheatgrass, is native to Eurasia and widely invasive in western North America. By late spring, this annual plant has dispersed its seed and died; its aboveground biomass then becomes fine fuel that burns as frequently as once every 3-5 y in its invaded range.

Diversity-invasibility across an experimental disturbance gradient in Appalachian forests

Publications Posted on: August 21, 2008
Research examining the relationship between community diversity and invasions by nonnative species has raised new questions about the theory and management of biological invasions.

Exotic invasive plants

Publications Posted on: March 25, 2008
Ecosystems worldwide are threatened by nonnative plant invasions that can cause undesirable, irreversible changes. They can displace native plants and animals, out-cross with native flora, alter nutrient cycling and other ecosystem functions, and even change an ecosystem's flammability (Walker and Smith 1997).