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Keyword: ponderosa pine forests

Are wildfires following bark beetles more severe?

Publications Posted on: June 17, 2020
Bark beetles are responsible for large numbers of dead trees in ponderosa pine forests in the United States. The relationship between tree mortality caused by bark beetles and increasingly severe wildfires has been analysed by Carolyn Sieg and colleagues using a detailed physics-based fire behaviour model.

Historical fire regimes in ponderosa pine forests of the Colorado Front Range, and recommendations for ecological restoration and fuels management

Publications Posted on: February 27, 2020
At the request of The Nature Conservancy and the Front Range Fuels Treatment Partnership, we are developing brief summaries of the current state of our scientific understanding of historical fire regimes in the forested landscapes of Colorado's Front Range. The area of interest extends from El Paso and Teller Counties, near Pikes Peak, to Larimer County and the Colorado-Wyoming border.

Litter and dead wood dynamics in ponderosa pine 
forests along a 160-year chronosequence

Publications Posted on: December 18, 2019
Disturbances such as fire play a key role in controlling ecosystem structure. In fire-prone forests, organic detritus comprises a large pool of carbon and can control the frequency and intensity of fire. The ponderosa pine forests of the Colorado Front Range, USA, where fire has been suppressed for a century, provide an ideal system for studying the long-term dynamics of detrital pools.

Silvicultural activities in Pringle Falls Experimental Forest, Central Oregon

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Pringle Falls Experimental Forest has been a center for research in ponderosa pine forests east of the crest of the Cascade Range since 1931. Long-term research facilities, sites, and future research opportunities are currently at risk from stand-replacement wildfire because of changes in stand structure resulting from past fire exclusion.

Implementing the expanded prescribed fire program on the Gila National Forest, New Mexico: implications for snag management

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Efforts to return natural fire to the Gila National Forest, New Mexico, have resulted in controversy regarding management of snags (standing dead trees). The importance of snags for wildlife, especially cavity-dependent birds, is well documented.

GSD update: A review of recent research by the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 14, 2015
This issue of the GSD Update takes a look at selected studies of the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program (GSD) that depict its strengths and focus areas. Significant results of recent research and science delivery by GSD scientists are highlighted related to 1) ecosystem resiliency, and native and invasive species management, and 2) the role of climate in species adaptation, restoration and management.

GSD Update: Year in Review: Spotlight on 2014 Research by the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program

Publications Posted on: April 15, 2015
In this issue of the GSD Update, we take a look back at selected studies of the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program (GSD) that depict its strengths and focus areas. Significant results of recent research and science delivery by GSD scientists are highlighted.

Habitat suitability and nest survival of white-headed woodpeckers in unburned forests of Oregon

Publications Posted on: August 31, 2011
We evaluated habitat suitability and nest survival of breeding white-headed woodpeckers (Picoides albolarvatus) in unburned forests of central Oregon, USA. Daily nest-survival rate was positively related to maximum daily temperature during the nest interval and to density of large-diameter trees surrounding the nest tree.

Pinon-juniper management research at Corona Range and Livestock Research Center in Central New Mexico

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
Description: New Mexico State University's Corona Range and Livestock Research Center (CRLRC) is located in a pinon-juniper (PJ)/grassland ecotone in the southern Basin and Range Province in south central New Mexico. A number of research projects conducted at this facility revolve around soil, plant, livestock, and wildlife responses to PJ woodland management.

The essence of fire regime-condition class assessment

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
The interagency-Fire Regime / Condition Class - assessment process (FRCC) represents a contemporary and effective means of estimating the relative degree of difference or "departure" a subject landscape condition is currently in, as compared to the historic or reference ecological conditions. This process generally applied to fire adapted systems is science-based and adaptive as are the very ecosystems that are being studied.

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