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Keyword: post-fire mortality

How does fire kill trees?

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 06, 2019
Each year wildland fires kill and injure trees on millions of forested hectares globally, causing both positive and negative impacts to plant and animal biodiversity, carbon storage, hydrologic processes, and ecosystem services. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of fire-caused tree mortality is important to accurately predict mortality, estimate fire-driven feedbacks to the global carbon cycle, extrapolate to novel future conditions, and implement appropriate management actions to increase forest resilience to wildfire.

Fire and tree death: Understanding and improving modeling of fire-induced tree mortality

Publications Posted on: December 04, 2018
Each year wildland fires kill and injure trees on millions of forested hectares globally, affecting plant and animal biodiversity, carbon storage, hydrologic processes, and ecosystem services. The underlying mechanisms of fire-caused tree mortality remain poorly understood, however, limiting the ability to accurately predict mortality and develop robust modeling applications, especially under novel future climates.

Six-year post-fire mortality and health of relict ponderosa pines in the Bob Marshall Wilderness Area, Montana

Publications Posted on: January 31, 2011
In 2003, lightning-caused fires burned through relict ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) stands in the Bob Marshall Wilderness, Montana, after decades of fire exclusion. Since many trees in these stands had Native American bark-peeling scars, concern arose about the adverse fire effects on this cultural and ecological resource. In 2004, Keane and others (2006) began a post-fire monitoring study of the relict pine stands.

Historical wildfire impacts on ponderosa pine tree overstories: An Arizona case study

Publications Posted on: January 12, 2009
The Rodeo-Chediski Wildfire--the largest in Arizona's history--damaged or destroyed ecosystem resources and disrupted ecosystem functioning in a largely mosaic pattern throughout the ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests exposed to the burn. Impacts of this wildfire on tree overstories were studied for 5 years (2002 to 2007) on two watersheds in the area burned.