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Keyword: prescribed fire

Forest soil disturbance: Implications of factors contributing to the wildland fire nexus

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2019
Wildfires and prescribed fires cause a range of impacts on forest soils depending on the interactions of a nexus of fire severity, scale of fire, slope, infiltration rates, and post-fire rainfall. These factors determine the degree of impact on forest soils and subsequently the need for post-fire soil management.

Identification of gas-phase pyrolysis products in a prescribed fire: first detections using infrared spectroscopy for naphthalene, methyl nitrite, allene, acrolein and acetaldehyde

Publications Posted on: August 28, 2019
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted from many sources, including wildland fire. VOCs have received heightened emphasis due to such gases’ influential role in the atmosphere, as well as possible health effects. We have used extractive infrared (IR) spectroscopy on recent prescribed burns in longleaf pine stands and herein report the first detection of five compounds using this technique.

Seeding native species to promote ecosystem recovery after fire

Science Spotlights Posted on: July 24, 2019
The use of prescribed fire to reduce expansion of pinyon and juniper to sagebrush ecosystems is a commonly used by managers but can have unwanted consequences. In this Joint Fire Sciences Program Demonstration Project, we show how seeding native species after prescribed fire can decrease invasion of nonnative annual grasses in sites with low resistance.

Fire and Smoke Model Evaluation Experiment (FASMEE): Fishlake National Forest prescribed burn

Projects Posted on: July 03, 2019
The Fire and Smoke Model Evaluation Experiment (FASMEE) is a large-scale interagency effort to identify how fuels, fire behavior, fire energy and meteorology interact to determine the dynamics of smoke plumes, the long-range transport of smoke and local fire effects such as soil heating and vegetative response. FASMEE is designed to collect observations from large prescribed fires by combining Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), radar, ground monitoring, aircraft and satellite imagery, and weather and atmospheric measurements. Knowing more about how wildland fire operates helps land managers better predict fire behavior, smoke impacts, and the short- to long-term effects of fire. It also promotes increased public and firefighter safety and aids in the allocation of firefighting resources.

Prescribed burns for grassland management at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge

Media Gallery Posted on: June 13, 2019
Prescribed Burns for Grassland Management at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge. Photo source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/desertlcc/albums/72157662184090168/with/39578596124/

Long-term experimental fire seasonality research on the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge

Projects Posted on: May 23, 2019
Land managers frequently use prescribed burning to help maintain grassland communities. Semiarid grassland dynamics following fire are linked to precipitation, with increasing soil moisture accelerating the rate of recovery. Prescribed fires are typically scheduled to follow natural fire regimes, but burning outside the natural fire season could be equally effective and more convenient for managers, depending on their management objectives. 

Seeding native species increases resistance to annual grass invasion following prescribed burning of semiarid woodlands

Publications Posted on: March 27, 2019
Exotic grass invasions are often facilitated by disturbances, which provide opportunities for invasion by releasing pulses of resources available to invaders. Where disturbances such as prescribed fire are used as a management tool, there is a pressing need to identify ecosystem attributes associated with susceptibility to disturbance-induced invasion.

Managing wildfire for whitebark pine ecosystem restoration in western North America

Publications Posted on: December 14, 2018
Wildfire in declining whitebark pine forests can be a tool for ecosystem restoration or an ecologically harmful event. This document presents a set of possible wildfire management practices for facilitating the restoration of whitebark pine across its range inWestern North America. These management actions are designed to enhance whitebark pine resilience and health, while also being effective wildfire management measures.

Restoration treatments in a Montana ponderosa pine forest: Effects on soil physical, chemical and biological properties

Documents and Media Posted on: November 30, 2018
Low-elevation ponderosa pine ecosystems of the inland northwestern United States experienced frequent, low-severity fire that promoted open stands dominated by large diameter ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa). Fire exclusion has led to increased stand densities, often due to proliferation of less fire-tolerant species and an increased risk of stand-replacing wildfire.Document Type: Other Documents

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Publications Posted on: October 05, 2018
The challenge of minimizing the impacts of smoke on the public while expanding the role of fire in land management has never been greater, as air quality standards tighten and the wildland-urban interface expands with people looking to live in natural environments with clean air.

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