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Keyword: rangeland restoration

Irrigation requirements for seed production of three leguminous wildflowers of the U.S. Intermountain West

Publications Posted on: July 10, 2018
Increasing the supply of native wildflower seed is essential for restoring burned and degraded wildlands in the Intermountain West. Limitations to wildland seed collection necessitate development of effective cultural practices to improve reliability of seed production in agricultural fields. Irrigation trials were conducted over multiple years for three perennial species in the Fabaceae family [Dalea ornata (Douglas ex Hook.) Eaton & J.

Irrigation requirements for seed production of two Eriogonum species in a semiarid environment

Publications Posted on: November 13, 2017
Seeds of native plants are needed for rangeland restoration in the Intermountain West. Many of these plants are rarely cultivated and relatively little is known about the cultural practices required for their seed production. Irrigation trials were conducted over multiple years for two perennial Eriogonum species, Eriogonum umbellatum Torr. and Eriogonum heracleoides Nutt.

Irrigation requirements for seed production of five Lomatium species in a semiarid environment

Publications Posted on: March 10, 2017
Seeds of native plants are needed for rangeland restoration in the Intermountain West. Many of these plants are rarely cultivated and relatively little is known about the cultural practices required for their seed production. Irrigation trials were conducted for five perennial Lomatium species over multiple years.

Quantifying restoration effectiveness using multi-scale habitat models: Implications for sage-grouse in the Great Basin

Publications Posted on: September 28, 2014
A recurrent challenge in the conservation of wide-ranging, imperiled species is understanding which habitats to protect and whether we are capable of restoring degraded landscapes.

Plant establishment and soil microenvironments in Utah juniper masticated woodlands

Publications Posted on: September 19, 2013
Juniper (Juniperus spp.) encroachment into sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) and bunchgrass communities has reduced understory plant cover and allowed juniper trees to dominate millions of hectares of semiarid rangelands. Trees are mechanically masticated or shredded to decrease wildfire potential and increase desirable understory plant cover.

Cultivation and irrigation of fernleaf biscuitroot (Lomatium dissectum) for seed production

Publications Posted on: October 19, 2012
Native grass, forb, and shrub seed is needed to restore rangelands of the U.S. Intermountain West. Fernleaf biscuitroot [Lomatium dissectum (Nutt.) Mathias & Constance] is a desirable component of rangelands. Commercial seed production is necessary to provide the quantity and quality of seed needed for rangeland restoration and reclamation efforts.

'Umatilla' snow buckwheat for rangeland restoration in the interior Pacific Northwest

Publications Posted on: June 05, 2012
Native plants are generally considered the best option for plant materials to restore productivity and diversity to degraded rangelands (McArthur 1988). It is difficult to find native plants capable of becoming established from seed in dense stands of introduced annual species such as cheatgrass. It has been easier to import species such as crested wheatgrass to restore perennial grasses on degraded rangelands.

Restoring native plants to crested wheatgrass stands

Publications Posted on: July 07, 2010
Crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn.) is a nonindigenous grass introduced to North America for improving degraded rangelands. It is often criticized for forming nearly monotypic stands. Our objective was to determine the feasibility of restoring native plant species to crested wheatgrass-dominated rangeland. We investigated methods for suppressing crested wheatgrass followed by revegetation with a mix of native species.

Competitive effects of bluebunch wheatgrass, crested wheatgrass, and cheatgrass on antelope bitterbrush seedling emergence and survival

Publications Posted on: January 14, 2010
The competitive environment into which plant seedlings emerge often determines the survival and performance of these individuals.

Effects of nitrogen availability and cheatgrass competition on the establishment of Vavilov Siberian wheatgrass

Publications Posted on: December 17, 2008
Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) is the most widespread invasive weed in sagebrush ecosystems of North America. Restoration of perennial vegetation is difficult and land managers have often used introduced bunchgrasses to restore degraded sagebrush communities. Our objective was to evaluate the potential of 'Vavilov' Siberian wheatgrass (Agropyron fragile [Roth] P. Candargy) to establish on cheatgrass-dominated sites.