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Keyword: research

Sustaining the grassland sea: Regional perspectives on identifying, protecting and restoring the Sky Island region's most intact grassland valley landscapes

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
Grasslands of the Sky Islands region once covered over 13 million acres in southeastern Arizona and adjacent portions of New Mexico, Sonora, and Chihuahua. Attempts to evaluate current ecological conditions suggest that approximately two thirds of these remain as intact or restorable grassland habitat.

Into the third dimension: Benefits of incorporating LiDAR data in wildlife habitat models

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
LiDAR (Light detection and ranging) is a tool with potential for characterizing wildlife habitat by providing detailed, three-dimensional landscape information not available from other remote sensing applications.

Potential for extending major land resource areas into northern Mexico

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
There is a significant history of cooperative efforts between Mexico and the United States on natural resource management issues. Mexico and the United States have jointly conducted research and developed range management technologies. Bringing these technologies together and improving technical communications are an ongoing process.

Gila River Basin Native Fishes Conservation Program

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
The Gila River Basin Native Fishes Conservation Program was established to conserve native fishes and manage against nonnative fishes in response to several Endangered Species Act biological opinions between the Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Central Arizona Project (CAP) water transfers to the Gila River basin.

Using remote sensing to monitor post-fire watershed recovery as a tool for management

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
Post-fire watershed recovery is influenced by numerous variables but one of the most important factors is the rate of re-establishment of vegetative cover.

Mapping and assessing the environmental impacts of border tactical infrastructure in the Sky Island Region

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
In this project we mapped the different types of border barriers, identified impacts of border infrastructure on public and private lands and conducted spatial analyses within the approximately 200 miles of international border in the Sky Island region. The Sky Island region, bisected by the U.S.-Mexico border, is critically important for its biodiversity and continental connectivity.

Post-wildfire erosion in the Chiricahua Mountains

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
The Horseshoe 2 Fire burned 90,226 ha (222,954 ac) of the Chiricahua Mountains in the Coronado National Forest of southeast Arizona from May 8 to June 25, 2011. This mountain range in the Madrean Archipelago was burned by widespread fires prior to 1890, numerous small fires after 1890, and, more recently, the 11,129 ha (27,500 ac) Rattlesnake Fire in 1994.

Impacts of wildfire on wildlife in Arizona: A synthesis

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
Due to a century of fire suppression practices, the Madrean Archipelago regions in Arizona have accumulated excessive fuel loads that increase wildfire sizes, intensities, and frequencies. Wildfire induced structural changes in forest ecosystems can either benefit or adversely impact wildlife species.

Effects of prescribed fires and a wildfire on biological resources of oak savannas in the Peloncillo Mountains, New Mexico

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
Private and public land managers are attempting to reintroduce fire into the ecosystems of the Peloncillo Mountains to reduce the density of woody species, increase the herbaceous plant cover, and improve the area’s ecological diversity.

Ecology and management of oak woodlands and savannas in the southwestern Borderlands Region

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
Management of the Madrean oak woodlands and the less dense and ecologically different oak savannas must be based on sound ecological information. However, relatively little is known about the Madrean oak ecosystems in spite of the fact that they cover about 80,000 km2 in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. Emory oak (Quercus emoryi), the dominant tree in most stands, is usually associated with other oak and juniper species.

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