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Keyword: research

Biodiversity and conservation of the Cienega de Saracachi area, Sonora, Mexico

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
The Ciénega de Saracachi area, including Arroyo Santo Domingo and Cañón Quemado, is in the Municipio de Cucurpe in north-central Sonora (30°21’33”N 110°35’29”W), ca. 105 km south of the Arizona border. The vegetation is cottonwood-willow riparian forest in the Ciénega and rocky stream canyons with desert grassland on the slopes above.

Observations on the seasonal distribution of native fish in a 10-kilometer reach of San Bernardino Creek, Sonora, Mexico

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
San Bernardino Creek is a northern tributary of the Río Yaqui that originates in the United States and crosses the International Border just east of Douglas, Arizona/Agua Prieta, Sonora and immediately south of San Bernardino/Leslie Canyon National Wildlife Refuge. Six of eight Río Yaqui native fishes occur in this reach:four minnows, a sucker, and a poeciliid.

Distribution of riparian vegetation in relation to streamflow in Pima County, Arizona

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
We compared the distribution of riparian forest and woodlands relative to water resource availability for a 2.3 million-acre region for the Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan (SDCP). Most of Pima County’s riparian vegetation occurs along stream reaches that classify as ephemeral.

Comparison of preliminary herpetofaunas of the Sierras la Madera (Oposura) and Bacadehuachi with the mainland Sierra Madre Occidental in Sonora, Mexico

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
Amphibians and reptiles were observed in the Sierra La Madera (59 species), an isolated Sky Island mountain range, and the Sierra Bacadéhuachi (30 species), the westernmost mountain range in the Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) range in east-central Sonora.

A comparison of the herpetofaunas of Ranchos Los Fresnos and El Aribabi in northern Sonora, Mexico

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
To compare and contrast herpetofaunas at Ranchos Los Fresnos and El Aribabi in north-central Sonora, México, we conducted herpetological surveys during 2006-2011, contacted others working in these two areas, and queried 27 museums and collections for specimens collected at or near these ranches. Based on this work, nine and seven amphibian, and 27 and 24 reptile species are known to occur at Ranchos El Aribabi and Los Fresnos, respectively.

Buying land for conservation purposes in Sonora, Mexico

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
The Northern Jaguar Reserve is 50,000 acres and one of the largest privately owned wildlife preserves in Sonora. Buying land in remote parts of Sonora takes special knowledge as ownership rules may not be clear and boundaries may not be defined in the records. There are complex legal procedures to guarantee ownership in which letters of intent play a crucial role, and there are special complexities for ejido lands.

Bird ecology and conservation on the Northern Jaguar Reserve: Recent lessons

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
The Northern Jaguar Reserve is in the western foothills of the Sierra Madre Occidental and in a broad transition zone between Nearctic and Neotropical faunal realms. We have assessed the distribution and abundance of birds across all four seasons in foothills thornscrub, oak woodland, and adjacent riparian areas, and discuss issues relevant to conservation and management.

When will female jaguars cross the border? Socio-demographics of the northern jaguar

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
Conservation biologists, NGOs, and the USFWS have established a goal of returning a viable population of jaguars into the United States. The source population for this recovery will come from Sonora, Mexico, the closest sub-population of the species. To maintain a viable population there must be females and an active corridor that allows passage of jaguars between Sonora, Arizona, and New Mexico.

Paleoenvironmental framework for understanding the development, stability, and state-changes of cienegas in the American deserts

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
As persistent wetlands in arid regions, ciénegas represent important resources for the maintenance and preservation of regional biodiversity. The history of ciénegas in the American Southwest over the last 8,000 years provides information on the dynamics of growth, longevity, and stability of these habitats under previous climate conditions.

Flora and vegetation of the Saint David and Lewis Springs Cienegas, Cochise County, Arizona

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2013
In the Sky Island region, cienegas are rare marshlands amidst arid surroundings where groundwater perennially intersects the surface. Their unique physical properties give rise to a characteristic plant community dominated by wetland graminoids. Evaporation usually causes the water to be alkaline, and vegetation around a cienega commonly includes halophytes and other unusual species.

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