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Keyword: restoration

Fire ecology and management in lowland riparian ecosystems of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico

Publications Posted on: December 06, 2019
Lowland riparian ecosystems, defined as those occurring at elevations at or below 5,000 feet (1,564 meters), constitute a small fraction of total land area in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, yet they are extremely important to human livelihoods and biotic communities.

A regional assessment of the ecological effects of chipping and mastication fuels reduction and forest restoration treatments.

Publications Posted on: December 04, 2019
Over the past several years, fire managers have increased their use of mastication treatments, the on-site disposal of shrubs and small-diameter trees through chipping and shredding. Mastication is a relatively untested management practice that alters the chemical and physical conditions of the forest floor and may influence vegetation regrowth and fuel development for years or decades.

Variability in mixed conifer spatial structure changes understory light environments

Publications Posted on: December 03, 2019
In fire-adapted conifer forests of the Western U.S., changing land use has led to increased forest densities and fuel conditions partly responsible for increasing the extent of high-severity wildfires in the region.

Seed and seedling traits have strong impacts on establishment of a perennial bunchgrass in invaded semi-arid systems

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
Many restoration projects use seeds to found new populations, and understanding phenotypic traits associated with seedling establishment in disturbed and invaded communities is important for restoration efforts world-wide. Focusing on the perennial grass Elymus elymoides, a native species common to sagebrush steppe communities in the Western United States, we asked if seed and seedling traits could predict field establishment.

Comparisons of cultivation methods for Lupinus sericeus, L. argenteus, L. prunophilus, and L. arbustus

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
Fire and invasive weeds have increased the demand for native seed for restoration across the Great Basin region of the US. Cultivation of native forbs could provide lessexpensive seed in necessary quantities to meet restoration needs that cannot be harvested from wildland populations alone. We evaluated 2 cultivation methods of 4 lupine species (Lupinus (Tournefort) [Fabaceae]) - hairy bigleaf lupine (L. prunophilusM.E.

Genecology of Thurber's Needlegrass (Achnatherum thurberianum [Piper] Barkworth) in the Western United States

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
Thurber’s needlegrass (Achnatherum thurberianum [Piper] Barkworth) is a key restoration species in the Great Basin and surrounding areas, yet comprehensive studies of how climate relates to genetic variation and seed zones for restoration projects are lacking. Potentially adaptive phenotypic traits of 66 diverse populations of Thurber’s needlegrass were measured in common gardens at Central Ferry, Washington and Reno, Nevada in 2012 and 2013.

Floral guilds of bees in sagebrush steppe: Comparing bee usage of wildflowers available for postfire restoration

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
Healthy plant communities of the American sagebrush steppe consist of mostly wind-pollinated shrubs and grasses interspersed with a diverse mix of mostly spring-blooming, herbaceous perennial wildflowers. Native, nonsocial bees are their common floral visitors, but their floral associations and abundances are poorly known. Extrapolating from the few available pollination studies, bees are the primary pollinators needed for seed production.

Abundances of coplanted native bunchgrasses and crested wheatgrass after 13 years

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
Crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum [L] Gaertm) has been seeded on more than 5 million hectares in western North America because it establishes more readily than native bunchgrasses.

Notice of release of fanny germplasm, carmel germplasm, and Bonneville germplasm Searls’ prairie clover

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
Three natural-track selected germplasms of Searls’ prairie clover (Dalea searlsiae (A. Gray) Barneby [Fabaceae]) have been released by the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS) for use in revegetation and restoration of semiarid rangelands in the western US. Searls’ prairie clover is a perennial leguminous forb that is native to Utah, Nevada, Arizona, and California.

Challenges of establishing big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) in rangeland restoration: effects of herbicide, mowing, whole-community seeding, and sagebrush seed sources

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
The loss of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) on sites disturbed by fire has motivated restoration seeding and planting efforts. However, the resulting sagebrush establishment is often lower than desired, especially in dry areas. Sagebrush establishment may be increased by addressing factors such as seed source and condition or management of the plant community.

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