You are here

Keyword: revegetation

Current and potential use of broadleaf herbs for reestablishing native communities

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Use of forbs for revegetation in the Intermountain West has been problematic due to the large number of species and lack of research data. Some forbs are found in numerous plant communities and distributed over wide geographic ranges while others are more narrowly adapted. Seed sources for revegetation use may be selected from species and ecotypes indigenous to the planting area.

Restoring Western Ranges and Wildlands, vol. 2

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This work, in three volumes, provides background on philosophy, processes, plant materials selection, site preparation, and seed and seeding equipment for revegetating disturbed rangelands, emphasizing use of native species.

Restoring Western Ranges and Wildlands, vol. 1

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This work, in three volumes, provides background on philosophy, processes, plant materials selection, site preparation, and seed and seeding equipment for revegetating disturbed rangelands, emphasizing use of native species.

Restoring Western Ranges and Wildlands, vol. 3

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This work, in three volumes, provides background on philosophy, processes, plant materials selection, site preparation, and seed and seeding equipment for revegetating disturbed rangelands, emphasizing use of native species.

Restoring Wyoming big sagebrush

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
The widespread occurrence of big sagebrush can be attributed to many adaptive features. Big sagebrush plays an essential role in its communities by providing wildlife habitat, modifying local environmental conditions, and facilitating the reestablishment of native herbs. Currently, however, many sagebrush steppe communities are highly fragmented.

Plant succession and approaches to community restoration

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
The processes of vegetation change over time, or plant succession, are also the processes involved in plant community restoration. Restoration efforts attempt to use designed disturbance, seedbed preparation and sowing methods, and selection of adapted and compatible native plant materials to enhance ecological function. The large scale of wildfires and weed invasion requires large-scale approaches to restoration.

Seed production and establishment of western Oregon native grasses

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
It is well understood that native grasses are ecologically important and provide numerous benefits. However, unfavorable economics, low seed yields for some species, genetic issues, and a lack of experience behind the production and establishment of most western Oregon native grasses remain significant impediments for their expanded use.

Sage-grouse habitat restoration symposium proceedings

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Declines in habitat of greater sage-grouse and Gunnison sage-grouse across the western United States are related to degradation, loss, and fragmentation of sagebrush ecosystems resulting from development of agricultural lands, grazing practices, changes in wildfire regimes, increased spread of invasive species, gas and oil development, and other human impacts.

Secondary invasion: The bane of weed management

Publications Posted on: April 21, 2016
Exotic plant invasions present a global threat to natural ecosystems, yet the efficacy of management efforts in mitigating invader impacts remains unclear. A rapidly emerging problem is that of secondary invasion — an increase in abundance of non-target exotics following treatment of targeted invasive plants.

Fire rehabilitation using native and introduced species: A landscape trial

Publications Posted on: March 26, 2015
rehabilitation study comparing a predominately introduced species seed mix used by the US Department of Interior-Bureau of Land Management (BLM), a mix of native and introduced species provided by the US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (ARS), and 2 native seed mixes (high and low diversity). Mixes were seeded with a rangeland drill on the big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata var. wyomingensis [Beetle & A.

Pages