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Keyword: revegetation

Chapter 26. Seed germination

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
Seed germination represents the means for survival and spread of many plants (McDonough 1977). Germination consists of three overlapping processes: (1) absorption of water, mainly by imbibition, causing swelling of the seed; (2) concurrent enzymatic activity and increased respiration and assimilation rates; and (3) cell enlargement and divisions resulting in emergence of root and plumule (Evanari 1957; Schopmeyer 1974b).

Chapter 25. Shrub and forb seed production

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
The success or failure of range restoration and revegetation programs depends on procurement of an adequate supply of quality grass, forb, and shrub seed. Rangeland species seed is either grown commercially or collected from wildland stands. Commercially produced seed of numerous grass species is available (Asay and Knowles 1985b; Horton and others 1990; Sours 1983).

Chapter 24. Seed collection, cleaning, and storage

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
Acquisition of quality seed in the quantity needed is essential for successful restoration and revegetation programs. Seed is grown and harvested as a crop, or collected from native stands. In the past, when native species were seeded, it was either collect the seed yourself, or go without. Now, there are dealers who supply seed of many native species on a regular basis. Some seed companies will contract for collection of specific species.

Chapter 23. Shrubs of other families

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
Numerous genera and species of shrubs occur throughout the Intermountain region in addition to those included in the Asteraceae, Chenopodiaceae, and Rosaceae families. Although shrubs are widespread throughout this region and dominate many areas, species richness is low compared to the shrub flora of the Pacific United States, Chile, western Australia, and South Africa (Stebbins 1975).

Chapter 22. Rosaceous shrubs

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
Important shrubs of the Rose Family (Rosaceae) in the Intermountain region are distributed from blackbrush and salt desert shrub communities through high elevation forests and meadows. Growth habits of this group vary from trailing brambles to upright shrubs and small trees. Some species are evergreen while others are deciduous. Many of these species are highly valued for the cover, fruits, and forage they provide for wildlife and livestock.

Chapter 21. Composite shrubs

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
The sunflower family (Compositae or Asteraceae) is the largest family of flowering plants. Its many species occur around the world as annual and perennial herbs and as shrubs and trees (Benson 1957; Cronquist 1968; Wagenitz 1977).

Chapter 20. Chenopod shrubs

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
Chenopod plants (Family Chenopodiaceae) are distributed worldwide but are especially prominent in some wet and dry saline or alkaline situations. Chenopods are both herbaceous and woody.

Chapter 19. Forbs for seeding range and wildlife habitats

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
Forbs are abundant in all vegetative types throughout the Intermountain West. Most are found intermixed in grasslands and as understory plants in shrub and forest types. Forbs provide ground cover, soil stability, community (flora and fauna) diversity, nutritious forage, and are of aesthetic value.

Chapter 18. Grasses

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
Grasses are adapted to a wide range of edaphic and climatic conditions and are found in nearly all plant communities. In the Western United States, grasses are seeded on disturbances to provide forage (Hull and Holmgren 1964; Vallentine 1989), wildlife habitat (Plummer and others 1968), and watershed stability (Cornelius 1946; Hafenrichter and others 1949; Piper 1934; Stewart and Young 1939).

Chapter 17. Guidelines for restoration and rehabilitation of principal plant communities

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
Range and wildland improvement projects conducted throughout the Intermountain region normally occur within specific plant communities. Each plant community has unique features that require different equipment, planting techniques, and plant materials to conduct improvement projects.

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