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Keyword: riparian ecosystems

Rio Grande Basin Consortium: Mission, goals, and activities

Publications Posted on: August 03, 2010
The Rio Grande Basin Consortium (RGBC) serves as a networking group and clearinghouse for scientific information pertaining to the Rio Grande Basin. Its membership consists of natural and social scientists from New Mexico’s three research universities, administrators, and resource managers from federal, state, and local governmental agencies, members of community and advocacy groups, and private citizens.

Tribal experiences and lessons learned in riparian ecosystem restoration

Publications Posted on: August 03, 2010
Riparian ecosystems have been part of the culture of land use of native peoples in the Southwest United States for thousands of years. The experiences of tribal riparian initiatives to incorporate modern elements of environment and development with cultural needs are relatively few.

Historic land use and grazing patterns in northern New Mexico

Publications Posted on: August 03, 2010
The entrance of the Spanish into what is now New Mexico in the 1500s permanently altered aboriginal land use and subsistence patterns by the introduction of domesticated animals such as horses, cattle. sheep, goats, and pigs. During the Spanish Colonial and Mexican periods, both the Puebloan groups and the Hispanic settlers practiced mixed farming featuring small numbers of livestock pastured in communal grazing areas.

The influence of prehistoric Anasazi cobble-mulch agricultural features of northern Rio Grande landscapes

Publications Posted on: August 03, 2010
Research concerning ancient Pueblo Indian farming, specifically the innovation of cobble-mulch gardens, suggests a manipulation of the local environment on a landscape level that helped create existing ecosystems. This agricultural technology, which consisted of a protective layer of gravel covering the productive soil, trapped seasonal runoff moisture in field areas, retained it, and guarded against evaporation.

Summer bird/vegetation associations in Tamarisk and native habitat along the Pecos River, southeastern New Mexico

Publications Posted on: August 03, 2010
The middle Pecos River lies in the short-grass prairie ecotype and lacked a substantial woodland community prior to tamarisk (Tamarisk chinensis) invasion. Tamarisk control is a concern for land managers on the Pecos River and other Southwestern riparian systems. Our research is part of a long term study investigating hydrological and wildlife response to tamarisk removal on the Pecos river in Eddy County, New Mexico.

Bat species using water sources in pinyon-juniper woodlands

Publications Posted on: August 03, 2010
Much is yet to be learned about the importance of bats in Southwestern ecosystems, their ecological requirements, and how habitats should be managed to sustain these important species. A first step towards these goals is to determine what species exist in different habitats and across what geographic ranges. The objective of this study was to identify the bat species which use pinyon-juniper habitats of the Middle Rio Grande Basin.

Distribution of Rio Grande cutthroat trout and its co-occurrence with the Rio Grande sucker and Rio Grande chub on the Carson and Santa Fe National Forests

Publications Posted on: August 03, 2010
Studies were initiated in June, 1994 by the USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station to update knowledge on the distribution of the Rio Grande cutthroat trout a Forest Service Sensitive Species, and its co-occurrence with two native cypriniforms, Rio Grande sucker and Rio Grande Chub. The Rio Grande sucker IS listed as endangered by the state of Colorado.

Insects of the riparian

Publications Posted on: August 03, 2010
This paper describes life histories, defoliation problems and other activities of insects associated with forest tree species growing along high elevation streams and river banks. In addition, examples of insects and diseases associated with lower elevation riparian areas are given.

Willow establishment in relation to cattle grazing on an eastern Oregon stream

Publications Posted on: August 03, 2010
Natural regeneration and growth of coyote willow (Salix exigua Nutt. ssp. exigua) and whiplash willow (S. lasiandra Bemth. var. caudata [Nutt.] Sudw.) were monitored from 1987 to 1993 on a low-elevation eastern Oregon stream degraded by more than a century of heavy livestock grazing. Treatments were no grazing, moderate spring grazing, moderate fall grazing, and continued heavy, season-long grazing by cattle.

Geomorphic response of a montane riparian habitat to interactions of ungulates, vegetation, and hydrology

Publications Posted on: August 03, 2010
Wildcat Creek, a tributary of the Black River on the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest is being studied to determine the impacts of cattle and elk grazing on riparian wet meadows. An intensive survey of a selected stream reach revealed a unique channel development involving an aggradation/degradation process in a pool-riffle sequence of an E-6 stream channel.

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