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Keyword: Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine

Strategies, tools, and challenges for sustaining and restoring high elevation five-needle white pine forests in western North America

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
Many ecologically important, five-needle white pine forests that historically dominated the high elevation landscapes of western North America are now being heavily impacted by mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus spp.) outbreaks, the exotic disease white pine blister rust (WPBR), and altered high elevation fire regimes. Management intervention using specially designed strategic treatments will be needed to conserve these keystone species.

Rust resistance in seedling families of Pinus albicaulis and Pinus strobiformis and implications for restoration

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
Infection and mortality levels from Cronartium ribicola, the fungus causing white pine blister rust, are very high in parts of the geographic range of Pinus albicaulis (whitebark pine) and P. strobiformis (Southwestern white pine). Genetic resistance to this non-native fungus will be one of the key factors in maintaining or restoring populations of these species in areas of high blister rust incidence.

Molecular dissection of white pine genetic resistance to Cronartium ribicola

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
Pinus monticola (Dougl. ex D. Don.) maintains a complex defence system that detects white pine blister rust pathogen (Cronartium ribicola J.C.Fisch.) and activates resistance responses. A thorough understanding of how it functions at the molecular level would provide us new strategies for creating forest trees with durable disease resistance. Our research focuses on molecular dissection of P.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) applications in white pine blister rust resistance screening

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
A goal of breeding programs for resistance to white pine blister rust is the development of multigenic resistance, even if the genetics and mechanisms of resistance may be imperfectly understood. The goal of multigenic resistance has prompted efforts to categorize host resistance reactions at increasingly finer scales, to identify heritable traits that may confer quantitative resistance.

Status of white pine blister rust and seed collections in california's high-elevation white pine species

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
White pine blister rust (caused by the non-native pathogen Cronartium ribicola) reached northern California about 80 years ago. Over the years its spread southward had been primarily recorded on sugar pine. However, observations on its occurrence had also been reported in several of the higher elevation five-needled white pine species in California.

Preliminary overview of the first extensive rust resistance screening tests of Pinus flexilis and Pinus aristata

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
Limber pine ( Pinus flexilis James) and Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine (P. aristata Engelm.; hereafter referred to as bristlecone pine) are the dominant pines that occupy high elevation habitats of the southern Rockies.

Past and current investigations of the genetic resistance to cronartium ribicola in high-elevation five-needle pines

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
All nine species of white pines native to the U.S. or Canada are susceptible to the introduced pathogen Cronartium ribicola. Of the six high elevation white pine species, the severe infection and mortality levels of Pinus albicaulis have been the most documented, but blister rust also impacts P. aristata, P. balfouriana, P. flexilis and P. strobiformis; only P. longaeva has not been documented to be infected in its natural range.

Histological observations on needle colonization by Cronartium ribicola in susceptible and resistant seedlings of whitebark pine and limber pine

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
Resistance to white pine blister rust based on a hypersensitive response (HR) that is conferred by a dominant gene has been identified as functioning in needles of blister rust-resistant families of sugar pine, western white pine and southwestern white pine. The typical HR response displays a characteristic local necrosis at the site of infection in the needles during the early stages of needle colonization by Cronartium ribicola.

Can microscale meteorological conditions predict the impact of white pine blister rust in Colorado and Wyoming?

Publications Posted on: July 01, 2011
White pine blister rust occurs when there are compatible interactions between susceptible hosts (white pines and Ribes spp.), inoculum (Cronartium ribicola spores), and local weather conditions during infection. The five spore stages of the white pine blister rust (WPBR) fungus have specific temperature and moisture conditions necessary for production, germination, and dissemination of spores.

Re-measurement of whitebark pine infection and mortality in the Canadian Rockies

Publications Posted on: July 01, 2011
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) populations are under threat across the species' range from white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola), mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), fire exclusion and climate change (Tomback and Achuff 2010).

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