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Keyword: sagebrush

Long-term effects of tree expansion and reduction on soil climate in a semiarid ecosystem

Publications Posted on: September 29, 2020
In sagebrush ecosystems, pinyon and juniper tree expansion reduces water available to perennial shrubs and herbs. We measured soil water matric potential and temperatures at 13-30 and 50-65 cm soil depths in untreated and treated plots across a range of environmental conditions. We sought to determine the effects of tree expansion, tree reduction treatments, and expansion phase at time of treatment over 12-13 yr post-treatment.

Long-term seeding outcomes in slash piles and skid trails after conifer removal

Publications Posted on: August 05, 2020
Conifer removal in interior woodland ecosystems of the western US is a common management treatment used to decrease fire hazard and shift woodlands to more historical states. Woody material is frequently removed by skidding material off site and via slash pile burning. Assessing the long-term outcomes of seeding treatments after such ground disturbing activities is critical for informing future management and treatment strategies.

Sagebrush identification, ecology, and palatability relative to sage-grouse

Publications Posted on: June 22, 2020
Basic identification keys and comparison tables for 23 low and big sagebrush (Artemisia) taxa are presented. Differences in sagebrush ecology, soil temperature regimes, geographic range, palatability, mineralogy, and chemistry are discussed. Coumarin, a chemical produced in the glands of some Artemisia species, causes UV-light fluorescence of the leaves.

Seeing species through the forbs by using DNA sequencing

Projects Posted on: August 01, 2019
Forbs are an integral component of terrestrial ecosystems and critical to pollinator health. However, we know very little about the biology of native forbs. Such knowledge is a prerequisite to developing restoration programs that use diverse forb species in restoration seeding.

Using our understanding of resilience to disturbance and resistance to invasive annual grasses to target management actions in the sagebrush biome

Projects Posted on: July 30, 2019
The concepts of ecological resilience and resistance to invasive annual grasses have been used to develop an understanding of sagebrush ecosystem response to disturbances like wildfire and management actions to reduce fuels and restore native ecosystems. A multi-scale framework that uses these concepts to prioritize areas for conservation and restoration at landscape scales and to determine effective management strategies at local scales has been developed by Chambers and her colleagues. Regional SageSTEP (Sagebrush Treatment Evaluation Project) data coupled with west-wide AIM (Assessment, Inventory and Monitoring) data provide a unique opportunity to refine the predictors of resilience and resistance and extend the existing multi-scale framework effort.

Seeding native species to promote ecosystem recovery after fire

Science Spotlights Posted on: July 24, 2019
The use of prescribed fire to reduce expansion of pinyon and juniper to sagebrush ecosystems is a commonly used by managers but can have unwanted consequences. In this Joint Fire Sciences Program Demonstration Project, we show how seeding native species after prescribed fire can decrease invasion of nonnative annual grasses in sites with low resistance.

Sage Advice for Managers: A new, collaborative science framework for conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome

Documents and Media Posted on: May 02, 2019
The two-part Science Framework for Conservation and Restoration of the Sagebrush Biome published by the U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station is a new, multi-scale approach to management of sagebrush ecosystems. The product of an extensive collaboration between State and Federal agencies and universities, it employs science on ecological resilience to disturbance and resistance to invasive species (like cheatgrass), along with Greater sage-grouse habitat requirements, to improve conservation planning and help prioritize management actions. Document Type: Other Documents

Sage advice for managers: A new, collaborative science framework for conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome

Pages Posted on: April 26, 2019
The two-part Science Framework for Conservation and Restoration of the Sagebrush Biome published by the U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station is a new, multi-scale approach to management of sagebrush ecosystems. The product of an extensive collaboration between State and Federal agencies and universities, it employs science on ecological resilience to disturbance and resistance to invasive species (like cheatgrass), along with Greater sage-grouse habitat requirements, to improve conservation planning and help prioritize management actions.

Rio Grande National Forest: Sagebrush bibliography

Documents and Media Posted on: April 23, 2019
One of the bibliographies included in the supplemental materials for the 2016 Rio Grande National Forest Climate Change Plan Revision workshop.  Document Type: Other Documents

New research provides scientific framework for conserving iconic sagebrush landscapes

FS News Posted on: April 15, 2019
An unprecedented conservation effort is underway across 11 Western states to address threats to sagebrush ecosystems and the many species that depend on them. Today, the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Interior released the Science Framework for Conservation and Restoration of the Sagebrush Biome (Part 2). The Science Framework provides a transparent, ecologically responsible approach for making policy and management decisions for sagebrush landscapes.

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