You are here

Keyword: savanna

Defining the Great Plains

Science Spotlights Posted on: December 03, 2019
The Great Plains is the grasslands of the central United States, but precise delineation of this region has evaded agreement due to the transition between Great Plains grasslands and forests of the eastern United States. After comparing Great Plains delineations in readily available GIS (geographic information system) layers, Rocky Mountain Research Station scientist Brice Hanberry established a northeastern boundary using evidence from historical tree surveys during the 1800s.

Defining the historical northeastern forested boundary of the Great Plains Grasslands in the United States

Publications Posted on: September 14, 2019
The Great Plains is the grasslands of the central United States, but precise delineation of this region has evaded agreement due to the transition between Great Plains grasslands and forests of the eastern United States. After comparing Great Plains delineations in readily available geographic information system layers, I established a northeastern boundary using evidence from historical tree surveys during the 1800s.

Light transmittance estimates in a longleaf pine woodland

Publications Posted on: March 23, 2010
While the importance of canopy structure in open woodlands and savannas on regulating the flow of energy and matter is well known, few studies have investigated how variation in overstory abundance influences canopy light transmission and the extent that estimates vary in their ability to characterize the light environment in these ecosystems.

Response of birds to fire in the American southwest

Publications Posted on: March 18, 2009
Fire was a common prehistoric disturbance in most southwestern grasslands, oak savannas, and coniferous forests, but not in Sonoran and Mojave desertscrub, or in riparian ecosystems. Prescribed burning should be applied, but under experimental conditions that facilitate studying its impacts on birds and other components of biodiversity.

Estimating combustion of large downed woody debris from residual white ash

Publications Posted on: October 03, 2006
The production of residual white ash patches within wildfires represents near-complete combustion of the available fuel and releases a considerable quantity of gases to the atmosphere. These patches are generally produced from combustion of large downed woody debris (LDWD) such as fallen trees and snags. However, LDWD are generally ignored in calculations of fuel combusted within environments where surface fires dominate (e.g.

Fire and birds in the southwestern United States

Publications Posted on: July 26, 2006
Fire is an important ecological force in many southwestern ecosystems, but frequencies, sizes, and intensities of fire have been altered historically by grazing, logging, exotic vegetation, and suppression. Prescribed burning should be applied widely, but under experimental conditions that facilitate studying its impacts on birds and other components of biodiversity.