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Keyword: soil

Metagenomic approaches to determine soil microbial communities associated with Armillaria root disease

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
Armillaria root disease causes extensive damage to tree roots throughout the world, but efficacious management practices are lacking. However, soil interactions among Armillaria species, microbial communities, and trees may determine the impact of pathogenic Armillaria on the growth and survival of trees. Two species, A. solidipes (highly virulent) and A. altimontana (less virulent), frequently co-occur in forests of inland northwestern USA.

Bedding of wetland soil: Effects of bed height and termite activity on wood decomposition

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2019
Microorganisms and termites are the primary wood decay agents in forests of the southeastern United States, whose activity can be affected by forest management practices. Bedding establishes raised planting beds on poorly-drained soils, but little is known about the effect of bedding or soil bed height on wood decomposition.

The Organic Truth: What 22 Years of Monitoring Reveals About Forest Soil Resiliency on the Kootenai National Forest

Documents and Media Posted on: April 16, 2019
It is impossible to avoid disturbing the forest when harvesting timber. Trees are felled, and soil is compacted beneath heavy equipment during harvest operations. Yet on many sites, the landscape recovers. A year later, a future forest may already be growing, with saplings and shrubs reclaiming the open ground. Even the soil recovers, as the results of a 22-year monitoring study in western Montana have shown. This finding is contrary to what was the accepted assumption, that compacted soils take a long time to recover, if at all, which in turn affects forest productivity. Document Type: Other Documents

The organic truth: What 22 years of monitoring reveals about forest soil resiliency on the Kootenai National Forest

Pages Posted on: March 28, 2019
It is impossible to avoid disturbing the forest when harvesting timber. Trees are felled, and soil is compacted beneath heavy equipment during harvest operations. Yet on many sites, the landscape recovers. A year later, a future forest may already be growing, with saplings and shrubs reclaiming the open ground. Even the soil recovers, as the results of a 22-year monitoring study in western Montana have shown. This finding is contrary to what was the accepted assumption, that compacted soils take a long time to recover, if at all, which in turn affects forest productivity.

Soil: The foundation of the ecosystem; effects of management activities on forest soils: Can we manage better?

Documents and Media Posted on: November 30, 2018
Since Aristotle considered soil in relation to plant nutrition (348-322 B.C.), knowledge of soils has made tremendous strides. The way we view soils has evolved from a focus on agriculture to modem views of soil from multiple perspectives, including that of soils as natural bodies, partitioners of water, a medium for plant growth, soils as ecosystems and ecosystem components, and soil as engineering materials. Document Type: Other Documents

Growth-limiting soil bulk densities as influenced by soil texture

Documents and Media Posted on: November 30, 2018
An important forest management concern is the possibility of reduced vegetative productivity due to soil compaction. Various research studies have shown the detrimental effects of soil compaction on the establishment and growth of forest and range plants (Lull 1959, Foil and Ralston 1967, Hatchell et al. 1970, Wilshire et al. 1978, Froehlich 1979, Greacen and Sands 1980, Wert and Thomas 1981).Document Type: Other Documents

Hazard assessment keys for evaluating site sensitivity to soil degrading processes guidebook

Documents and Media Posted on: November 21, 2018
This guidebook has been prepared to help forest resource managers plan, prescribe and implement sound forest practices that comply with the Forest Practices Code.Document Type: Other Documents

Productivity Documents

Pages Posted on: November 19, 2018
NFS Documents Research Publications Graduate Theses National Forest System (NFS) Documents  Region 1 Forest Service Handbooks

Impacts on soils from cut-to-length and whole tree harvesting

Documents and Media Posted on: October 26, 2018
A field-based study was conducted to compare the degree and extent of impacts on soils from cut-to-length (CTL) and whole tree (WT) harvesting operations. A CTL harvesting system used less area to transport logs to the landings than did the WT harvesting system (20% vs. 25%).Document Type: Other Documents

Monitoring Concerns

Pages Posted on: October 17, 2018
Burned SoilCompactionDisplacementGround CoverNutrient CyclingPuddlingRegenerationSurface Organics

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