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Keyword: soils

Post-fire field observations across the 2007 Egley Fire in central Oregon (1st Edition)

Datasets Posted on: December 30, 2020
This data publication contains field observations taken in 2008 at 350 plots within the extent of the 2007 Egley Fire in central Oregon. Plots were located as paired sites in areas that had been treated and untreated prior to the 2007 Egley Fire. Field observations include a suite of vegetation, soil, fuel, and surface cover characteristics.

Post-fire field observations across the 2007 Egley Fire in central Oregon (2nd Edition)

Datasets Posted on: December 30, 2020
This data publication contains field observations taken in 2008 at 350 plots within the extent of the 2007 Egley Fire in central Oregon. Plots were located as paired sites in areas that had been treated and untreated prior to the 2007 Egley Fire. Field observations include a suite of vegetation, soil, fuel, and surface cover characteristics.

Field attributes and satellite data for "How vegetation recovery and fuel conditions in past fires influences fuels and future fire management in five western U.S. ecosystems" (1st Edition)

Datasets Posted on: December 30, 2020
This data publication contains field and satellite observations at 1567 plots across wildfire extents that burned between the years 2000-2007, collected for Joint Fire Science Project ID: 14-1-02-27. Field attributes were measured between the years 2013-2016 and include a suite of vegetation, soil, and surface cover characteristics.

Field attributes and satellite data for "How vegetation recovery and fuel conditions in past fires influences fuels and future fire management in five western U.S. ecosystems" (2nd Edition)

Datasets Posted on: December 30, 2020
This data publication contains field and satellite observations at 1567 plots across wildfire extents that burned between the years 2000-2007, collected for Joint Fire Science Project ID: 14-1-02-27. Field attributes were measured between the years 2013-2016 and include a suite of vegetation, soil, and surface cover characteristics.

Habitat and growth of ponderosa pine seedlings 11-16 years after fire

Science Spotlights Posted on: November 02, 2020
Ponderosa pine seedling establishment can be constrained following especially large, high-severity wildfires. Young seedlings face high mortality levels in the first few years and remain vulnerable to the next fire until they are taller. Understanding attributes associated with the growth of naturally regenerating seedlings that survive 10+ years postfire is useful in developing post-fire management strategies.

Persistent effects of fire severity on ponderosa pine regeneration niches and seedling growth

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2020
Several recent studies have documented how fire severity affects the density and spatial patterns of tree regeneration in western North American ponderosa pine forests. However, less is known about the effects of fire severity on fine-scale tree regeneration niche attributes such as understory plant composition and cover, surface fuel abundance, and soil properties, or how these attributes in turn affect regenerating ponderosa pine growth.

Temperate forests and soils [Chapter 6]

Publications Posted on: June 25, 2020
Temperate forests are extensive in the mid-latitudes of Earth and include a broad range of forest types and climates. Temperate forest soils reflect the seasonal variability in temperature and precipitation that make them productive and highly variable. Temperate forest soils also reflect the forest vegetation under which they develop.

Soils and nutrient considerations

Publications Posted on: June 22, 2020
Fire suppression has resulted in a buildup of forest litter and an accumulation of organic nitrogen, and a decrease in available potassium. This has changed the historic structure of soils and their nutrient content. Studies at 15 sites in Montana have looked at a wide range of changes in soil productivity following prescribed fire.

Methods for the measurement of infiltration

Publications Posted on: February 19, 2020
The measurement of infiltration has, in recent years, assumed increasing importance as a means of estimating the relative absorptive capacities of soils under different vegetal types or kinds of land use. The utility of infiltration-criteria rests partly on the assumption that surface-runoff in any appreciable volume is deleterious and that it results in movement of soil and in excessive peak-rates of stream-flow.

Notes from the Manitou Experimental Forest

Publications Posted on: February 19, 2020
The Manitou Experimental Forest is a branch of the Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. It is in the Pike National Forest, 28 miles north and west of Colorado Springs. This experimental area of 26 square miles was established in 1936 to study problems of watershed management, grazing, and other kinds of land use in the Front Range of the Colorado Rockies.

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