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Keyword: species distribution

FIRE-BIRD: A GIS tool for applying habitat suitability models to inform land management planning

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 04, 2019
To conserve and promote biological diversity, land managers must identify suitable habitat for species of conservation concern. Managers can then restrict potentially detrimental activities (e.g., salvage logging) to areas of lower habitat suitability, and target beneficial activities (e.g., restoration) where habitat suitability is higher. We developed FIRE-BIRD, an ArcGIS tool, to map habitat suitability for disturbance-associated woodpeckers of conservation concern to inform postfire management and restoration treatments in dry mixed-conifer forests. 

FIRE-BIRD: Habitat suitability model application tools for disturbance-associated woodpeckers

Tools Posted on: July 25, 2019
FIRE-BIRD is an ArcGIS spatial tool for applying habitat suitability models to generate maps that inform forest management planning. This tool focuses on disturbance-associated woodpecker species of conservation concern.

Repurposing environmental DNA samples to verify the distribution of Rocky Mountain tailed frogs in the Warm Springs Creek Basin, Montana

Publications Posted on: June 26, 2019
Rocky Mountain tailed frogs (Ascaphus montanus) were thought to exist exclusively in two tributaries of Warm Springs Creek watershed - Storm Lake Creek and Twin Lakes Creek, based on opportunistic observations of tailed frogs during fish sampling rather than formal basin-wide sampling for frogs.

FIRE-BIRD: A GIS-based toolset for applying habitat suitability models to inform land management planning

Publications Posted on: June 20, 2019
Habitat suitability models can inform forest management for species of conservation concern. Models quantify relationships between known species locations and environmental attributes, which are used to identify areas most likely to support species of concern. Managers can then limit negative human impacts in areas of high suitability or conduct habitat improvements in areas of marginal suitability.

eDNAtlas Data mapper

Lab Notes Posted on: September 06, 2018
Analyzing eDNA samples in a lab allows researchers to reliably determine where target species are found and overcomes previous limitations of traditional sampling techniques. The eDNAtlas website and dynamic database tools allow the public, managers, and researchers to access results from samples of environmental DNA (eDNA).  

The eDNAtlas project: A national map of aquatic biodiversity

Science Spotlights Posted on: June 07, 2018
The National Genomics Center for Wildlife and Fish Conservation pioneered development of eDNA sampling of aquatic environments at their laboratory in Missoula, MT. The Center has partnered with dozens of National Forests, as well as other state, federal, tribal, and private natural resource organizations to assist in the collection and processing of eDNA samples. Thousands of eDNA samples are collected annually and constitute a rapidly growing biodiversity archive that provides precise information about native and non-native species distributions, temporal trends in those distributions, and the efficacy of species and habitat restoration and conservation efforts. eDNA sampling provides a low-cost & sensitive method for determining which species occur in water bodies. Rapid adoption of eDNA sampling by many natural resource agencies led to an exponential increase in data and the need for an open-access database. The website and open-access database were launched in June 2018 with approximately 6,000 samples and is updated semi-annually with newly processed samples.

Southwestern white pine - threats to the species in a changing world

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 19, 2017
Collaborative research is quantifying adaptive variation in tree species, specifically in southwestern white pine, across the western United States. This research predicts changes in species distribution and their ability to adapt in the face of global change by combining population-wide genomic data collection, common garden manipulative experiments, pathogen resistance trials, and simulation modeling.

Map your models with ModelMap

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 13, 2016
Working in the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program, we have access to a valuable collection of detailed information about forests on thousands of sample plots distributed across the country. This information is used to produce summaries of forestland characteristics for a variety of geographic areas such as states or individual national forests. We wanted a simple tool to extend this sample data and make detailed maps of forest characteristics for all the land in between the study locations.

Atlas of current and potential future distributions of common trees of the eastern United States

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This atlas documents the current and possible future distribution of 80 common tree species in the Eastern United States and gives detailed information on environmental characteristics defining these distributions. Also included are outlines of life history characteristics and summary statistics for these species.

The range-wide bull trout eDNA project

Projects Posted on: February 04, 2016
The bull trout has a historical range that encompasses many waters across the Northwest. Though once abundant, bull trout have declined in many locations and is now federally listed and protected under the Endangered Species Act. Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists initiated the range-wide bull trout eDNA project in partnership with biologists from more than 20 organizations to create sound and precise information about the distribution of bull trout in thousands of streams across their range.

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