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Keyword: streamflow

Supporting data for "Evaluating the Factors Responsible for Post-Fire Water Quality Response in Forests of the Western USA"

Datasets Posted on: December 30, 2020
Spatially-referenced data used in the study "Evaluating the Factors Responsible for Post-Fire Water Quality Response in Forests of the Western USA":

Watering the Forests for the Trees: Water Yield and Changes in Forest Cover

Documents and Media Posted on: August 07, 2020
Forest cover loss may decrease water yield, particularly following nonstand-replacing disturbance in semi-arid western forests. This contradicts the long-held expectation that water yield increases when tree cover is reduced. Document Type: Other Documents

Forests and water yield: A synthesis of disturbance effects on streamflow and snowpack in western coniferous forests

Publications Posted on: March 24, 2020
In coniferous western forests, recent widespread tree mortality provided opportunities to test the long-held theory that forest cover loss increases water yield. We reviewed 78 studies of hydrologic response to standing-replacing (severe wildfire, harvest) or nonstand-replacing (drought, insects, low-severity wildfire) disturbances, and reassessed the question: Does water yield or snowpack increase after forest disturbance?

Disturbance effects on water yield in western coniferous forests

Science Spotlights Posted on: March 20, 2020
In coniferous western forests, recent widespread tree mortality provided opportunities to test the long-held theory that forest cover loss increases water yield. Collective results indicate that post-disturbance streamflow and snowpack may increase, stay the same, or even decrease. This post-disturbance hydrologic response depends on vegetation structure, climate, and topography.  New hypotheses continue to be formulated and tested in this rapidly evolving discipline.

Patterns and trends in streamflow from 1939 to 1980 at Workman Creek, Sierra Ancha Experimental Forest, Arizona

Publications Posted on: March 12, 2020
Water is a vital natural resource and its paucity in the Southwest makes it of particular importance. There is a long history in the Southwest of research on increasing water yields from forests starting in 1911 at Wagon Wheel Gap Experimental Watershed in central averaged 22.01 inches while summer precipitation Colorado. Watershed studies in the Salt River Basin began in 1925 with the Summit Plots upstream from Roosevelt Dam.

Watershed Management Research Meeting: Manitou Experimental Forest

Publications Posted on: February 19, 2020
This meeting was planned to allow a review of the measurements and processes involved in watershed research. The agenda lists topics and discussion leaders. The discussion should come from all those present. We are fortunate to have with us Bernie Frank, Ted Osborne, and Hank Sims from the Washington Office; George Hardaway and Alan Iamb from Region 3; and Jack McNutt from Region 2. We'll expect to hear from them throughout the meeting.

Disentangling effects of forest harvest on long-term hydrologic and sediment dynamics, western Cascades, Oregon

Publications Posted on: November 21, 2019
The magnitude of sediment yield following forest timber harvest is controlled by increases in both sediment supply and streamflow. Since the relation between sediment transport and streamflow typically follows a power law, small increases in streamflow may translate into large increases in sediment transport.

Modeled historical streamflow metrics for the contiguous United States and National Forest Lands

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
Available water supply varies greatly across the United States depending on topography, climate, elevation and geology. Forested and mountainous locations, such as national forests, tend to receive more precipitation than adjacent non-forested or low-lying areas. However, contributions of national forest lands to regional streamflow volumes is largely unknown.

Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest daily average streamflow data: 1992-2001

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
This data publication contains daily average streamflow from October 1992 through September 2001 for 11 stream gauging stations located on the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (TCEF) which is located in the Little Belt Mountains of Central Montana, USA. Streamflow was measured at two locations on Tenderfoot Creek (Upper and Lower) as well as seven subwatersheds.

Between the Lines: Tree Rings Hold Clues About a River’s Past

FS News Posted on: January 10, 2018
Hydrologists are looking centuries into the past to better understand an increasingly uncertain water future.

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