You are here

Keyword: Strix occidentalis lucida

In the hot seat: Mexican Spotted Owl habitat could dry up in the face of climate change

Publications Posted on: December 14, 2020
Global climate change represents a growing conservation threat, but our understanding of the effects of climate change remains limited for most species. Understanding these effects may be particularly important for species that are already threatened by other factors, because climate change may interact synergistically with those factors. One such species is the threatened Mexican Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis lucida).

Annual climate in Mexican Spotted Owl habitat in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico: Implications for responding to climate change

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2020
Global climate change presents a growing conservation threat, but our understanding of the effects of climate change remains limited for most species. We evaluated the annual climate cycle for threatened Mexican Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) in high-elevation mixed-conifer forests in the Sacramento Mountains of New Mexico from 2005 to 2010.

Roost sites of radio-marked Mexican spotted owls in Arizona and New Mexico: sources of variability and descriptive characteristics

Publications Posted on: June 22, 2020
To increase understanding of roosting habitat of Mexican Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) and factors that influence use of roosting habitat, we sampled habitat characteristics at 1790 sites used for roosting by 28 radio-marked Mexican Spotted Owls in three study areas in Arizona and New Mexico.

Calling behavior of spotted owls in Northern Arizona

Publications Posted on: June 22, 2020
I studied the calling behavior of radio-tagged Mexican Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) in northern Arizona. Owls used a variety of calls, with three call types (Four-note Location Call, Contact Call, and Bark Series) accounting for 86% of calling bouts heard. These calls were used by both sexes, but in significantly different proportions.

Comparative habitat use of sympatric Mexican spotted and great horned owls

Publications Posted on: June 22, 2020
To provide information on comparative habitat use, we studied radiotagged Mexican spotted owls (Strix occidentalis lucida: n = 13) and great horned owls (Bubo virginianus: n = 4) in northern Arizona. Home-range size (95% adaptive kernel estimate) did not differ significantly between species during either the breeding or nonbreeding season.

Status and ecology of Mexican spotted owls in the Gila Region, New Mexico

Publications Posted on: March 04, 2020
The highlands of New Mexico's Gila region provide an important stronghold for the Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida Nelson). Historical data document that this region supported spotted owls in the past, and recent studies indicate that owls are both relatively common and well distributed in this region at present.

Winter Movements and Range Use of Radio-marked Mexican Spotted Owls: An Evaluation of Current Management Recommendations

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
We summarized existing knowledge on winter movements and range and habitat use of radio-marked Mexican spotted owls. In light of that information, we evaluated the adequacy of current management guidelines. Seasonal movement or "migration" appears to be a regular feature of the winter ecology of Mexican spotted owls.

Associations between forest fire and Mexican spotted owls

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
In 1993, the US Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida) as threatened, in part because of the rising threat to its habitat from stand-replacing wildfires. In 1997, we surveyed 33 owl sites that, in the previous four years, had burned at various levels ranging from light controlled burns to stand-replacing fires.

Evaluating desired conditions for Mexican spotted owl nesting and roosting habitat

Publications Posted on: June 24, 2016
The Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida) was listed as a threatened species in 1993, primarily because of concerns over the loss of late seral forest habitat to timber harvest and wildfire.

Using terrestrial ecosystem survey data to identify potential habitat for the Mexican spotted owl on National Forest System lands: a pilot study

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
We assessed the usefulness of Terrestrial Ecosystem Survey (TES) data as a means of identifying habitat for the Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida) in three National Forests in Arizona. This spatial data set incorporates information on soils, vegetation, and climatic conditions in defining a set of ecological "map units" showing potential vegetation.

Pages