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A Quantitative Synthesis of Place Attachment Research: Investigating Past Experience and Place Attachment

Publications Posted on: June 22, 2020
Presented at the 2003 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium, Bolton Landing, NY

Chapter 12: Integrating social, ecological, and economic factors in sustainable recreation planning and decisionmaking

Publications Posted on: May 15, 2020
Sustainability science “transcends the concerns of its foundational disciplines and focuses instead on understanding the complex dynamics that arise from interactions between human and environmental systems” (Clark 2007: 1737).

Chapter 5: Rethinking “outdoor recreation” to account for the diversity of human experiences and connections to public lands

Publications Posted on: May 13, 2020
This chapter explores the historical use and application of the term “outdoor recreation” as an organizing theme for sustainable public land management planning. We suggest that agencies need a more encompassing concept and approach to management involving people—one that recognizes the variety of connections that people have with natural and cultural landscapes, whether for leisure, lifestyle, livelihood, or health.

Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Seventh World Wilderness Congress symposium; 2001 November 2-8; Port Elizabeth, South Africa

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
The Seventh World Wilderness Congress met in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, in 2001. The symposium on science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values was one of several symposia held in conjunction with the Congress.

Wilderness in the Circumpolar North: searching for compatibility in ecological, traditional, and ecotourism values; 2001 May 15-16; Anchorage, AK

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
There are growing pressures on undeveloped (wild) places in the Circumpolar North. Among them are pressures for economic development, oil and gas exploration and extraction, development of geothermal energy resources, development of heavy industry close to energy sources, and lack of appreciation for "other" orientations toward wilderness resources by interested parties from broad geographical origins.

Place affinities, lifestyle mobilities and quality-of-life

Publications Posted on: January 19, 2012
Tourism is a spatial practice involving two seemingly opposing geographic processes. One is aptly captured by McHugh's (2006b) phrase "nomads of desire" referring to the ways amenity-seeking mobilities and travel are deeply rooted in the Western imagination.

Growing pressures on Circumpolar North wilderness: A case for coordinated research and education

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
Pressures are growing on undeveloped (wild) places in the Circumpolar North. Among them are economic development, oil and gas exploration and extraction, development of geothermal energy resources, development of heavy industry close to energy sources, and lack of appreciation for “other” orientations toward wilderness resources.

Wilderness and well-being: Complexity, time, and psychological growth

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
This paper presents the argument for interdisciplinary wilderness research. The idea of interdisciplinarity is grounded in theories of emotion and psychological growth that are compatible with basic knowledge in other scientific disciplines, and in particular with concepts related to evolution.

Alaska exceptionality hypothesis: Is Alaska wilderness really different?

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
The common idiom of Alaska as “The Last Frontier” suggests that the relative remoteness and unsettled character of Alaska create a unique Alaskan identity, one that is both a “frontier” and the “last” of its kind.

Evaluating nature and wilderness in Iceland

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
Iceland is sparsely populated with towns and farms mostly restricted to coastal lowlands. The country’s ca 50,000 km2 (19,000 mi2) interior is an uninhabited highland with isolated mountains and large glaciers.

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