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Keyword: visitors

Information collection styles of wilderness users: a market segmentation approach

Publications Posted on: March 11, 2006
Attempts to influence the behavior of wilderness visitors through the use of information are limited by the visitors’ reception of that information. This study examined the information gathering behavior of wilderness visitors and the effect of different information collection styles on visitors’ knowledge of low-impact behavior and attitudes toward wilderness management.

Communicating minimum impact behavior with trailside bulletin boards: Visitor characteristics associated with effectiveness

Publications Posted on: March 11, 2006
Bulletin boards are a frequently used method of communicating minimum impact behaviors to wilderness visitors. But how effective are they? What types of visitors are most likely to pay attention to the messages posted there?

Visitors' relationship to the resource: comparing place attachment in wildland and developed settings

Publications Posted on: March 11, 2006
Emotional/symbolic and functional place attachments were measured on the Green and Colorado Rivers in Canyonlands National Park and at Mount Rushmore National Memorial. Although Canyonlands and Mount Rushmore represent very different recreational settings, it was possible to measure both types of attachment by using 12 place attachment statements.

Recreational kayak visitor use, distribution, and financial value of beaches in western Prince William Sound, Alaska, between 1987-1998

Publications Posted on: March 11, 2006
Visitor use data was collected for the years 1987 to 1998 from sea kayak guide/outfitters, charter boats, lodges and rental businesses operating in western Prince William Sound, Alaska. The majority of the Sound is part of the Chugach National Forest and includes the 2.1 million-acre Nellie Juan Wilderness Study Area, where most recreational use examined in this study is concentrated.

Perceptions of and preferences for fee program dollar utilization among wilderness visitors

Publications Posted on: March 11, 2006
The purpose of this study was to ascertain visitor perceptions of a fee program and preferences for management utilization of the fee dollars. Differences in program perceptions were examined both by activity and activity style. Wilderness visitors in the American Southwest were surveyed on-site during the 1997–1998 season. Overall, respondents moderately agreed that they knew about and understood the program.

Response to conflict among wilderness visitors

Publications Posted on: March 11, 2006
Previous conceptual efforts suggest that response to recreational conflict should be framed within an adapted stresscoping response model. An important element in understanding response to conflict is the context of the experience.

Examining leisure event opportunities of Isle Royale National Park: bridging the gap between social process and spatial form

Publications Posted on: March 11, 2006
To manage various recreation opportunities, managers and planners must consider the spatial and temporal scale of social process when identifying opportunities on base maps. However, analyses of social process and spatial form are often treated as two distinct approaches--sociological and geographical approaches.

The rise of the day visitor in wilderness: should managers be concerned?

Publications Posted on: March 11, 2006
Results of research in Shenandoah National Park Wilderness on the differences between day and overnight visitors to the park’s wilderness showed that the two user groups are not as different as originally thought. While the two groups differed somewhat in their level of support for traditional wilderness values, these differences are largely a matter of degree.

Donations as an alternative to wilderness user fees: the case of the desolation wilderness

Publications Posted on: March 09, 2006
Day-use visitors to the Desolation Wilderness were asked about making voluntary donations at the trailhead. Of the 111 visitors who used one of the four trailheads at which voluntary donations were requested, 55% reported making a donation, with an average reported donation amount of $4.20. Subjects were categorized into three groups: donors, would-be donors, and nondonors.

Meanings and implications of acceptability judgements for wilderness use impacts

Publications Posted on: March 09, 2006
While the concept of “acceptability” is central to the Limits of Acceptable Change (LAC) framework, there is inadequate understanding of how “acceptability” is judged and how unacceptable conditions affect visitor experiences. To address this knowledge gap, visitors to nine wilderness areas were interviewed.

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